Oedipus the King Hamartia Essay

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    Oedipus Hamartia

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    In the play Oedipus the King by Sophocles, Oedipus exemplifies a man whose hamartia is that he does not know himself. Hamartia is a fatal flaw leading to the tragic downfall of a hero, and Oedipus’s fatal flaw is how he does not know his real self. In the play, the truth about many parts of his life are revealed; such as how King Polybus and Queen Merope of Corinth are not his real parents, that he was the one who killed King Lauis and caused the plague to the city, and that his prophecy was unknowingly

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    Oedipus Tragic Hero

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    Picture yourself going from being the King of Thebes to a widowed, motherless man who is forced to exile and fend for himself without sight. This is what occurred in Sophocles’ play, Oedipus Rex. A tragedy is composed of six elements that determine the quality of each part. It starts off with a flaw that leads to a hero’s passing, the acknowledgement of these flaws, and lethal punishment of the tragic hero. The play, Oedipus Rex, is about a king who finds out that he killed his own father and married

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    Oedipus: The King of Thebes and Tragic Hero Ancient Greek Literature encompasses an assortment of poetry and drama to include the great masterpieces of tragedy. In Classic Literature, tragedies were commonly known for their elaboration of a protagonist fitting the classification of a tragic hero. This type of a tragic hero often collectively described as a character of noble birth, facing an adversity of some nature and a fate of great suffering. The characteristics of what encompassed a tragic hero

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    Counterarguments Free Will and Hamartia Counterargument #1: P. H. Vellacott for Free Will Many classicists believe that Oedipus’s fall is due to his Free will and the decisions he makes. Those who hold this belief hold that Oedipus made his own decisions, which is what led to his fall and that he was not compelled by some external source. P. H. Vellacott is a strong supporter of this theory. As such, in his famous essay, “The Guilt of Oedipus,” Vellacott argues that, factually speaking, Oedipus must have at one

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    undeniable truth. Within Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex, Oedipus is told of his impending prophecy of killing his father, Laius, and marrying his mother, Jocasta. Knowing this, he tries to prevent his fate, but ends up becoming oblivious to it once it has happened. Oedipus enters a city that claims that their king has been killed shortly after he murdered someone, he fails to connect the two events together and discover that he has started to fulfill the prophecy. Oedipus Rex displays that humans will ignore

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    Is Oedipus a tragic hero? Italicize the book The definition of tragedy is great suffering, destruction, or distress like a disaster. The term is commonly used in our society but where did it come from. Aristotle, an ancient greek philosopher, laid the foundation for the definition of a tragedy that we still use today. His idea of tragedy is a character who makes a judgment error that inevitably lead to his or her own destruction. He called this a tragic hero. Aristotle's’ idea was based on five

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    Sophocles’ tragedy Oedipus Rex details the catastrophic downfall of Oedipus, King of Thebes, who kills his father, marries his mother, and plagues his kingdom unknowingly. Aristotle’s discourse Poetics references Oedipus Rex as containing several elements of the ideal tragedy (CITE). Among other factors, Aristotle stresses that the tragic hero’s collapse does not occur in response to his or her depravity, but in reaction to a “serious error” (CITE). Throughout the play, Oedipus demonstrates to readers

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    Oedipus Rex Vs. Antigone

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    Daniel Nierenberg Comparative Essay 11-20-01 "Oedipus Rex" & "Antigone" It is only natural that an author use similar vessels of literature, such as figurative language, literary devices, and elements in his/her work. It is even more apparent between works that are connected by character, time, and theme. Sophocles did this when he wrote "Oedipus Rex" and "Antigone". When comparing the two pieces, it becomes evident that very similar vessels connected these very different plays. Sophocles uses a

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    blinding himself, as opposed to committing suicide, Oedipus achieves a kind of surrogate death that intensifies his suffering. He comments on the darkness - not just the literal inability to see, but also religious and intellectual darkness - that he faces after becoming blind. In effect, Oedipus is dead, for he receives none of the benefits of the living; at the same time, he is not dead by definition, and so his suffering cannot end. Oedipus receives the worst of both worlds between life and death

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    Sophocles’ play, King Oedipus is a perfect example of a clear Aristotelian tragedy. In fact, it was so perfect that Aristotle himself considered it the ideal tragedy. An Aristotelian tragedy is “serious action in a dramatic text that portrays incidents arousing pity and fear, causing catharsis in the audience.” Aspects of a tragedy include a tragic hero, who is neither good nor bad, who has a hamartia which causes him to ignore a divine warning or violate a moral law. A common example of hamartia is hubris

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