Oscar Wilde Importance of Being Earnest Essay

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    unobtainable. Every person is a product of the culture they live; they are dictated how to act and their social interactions, pretty much how to live. That being said, it sometimes causes problems between being one true self and conforming to the ideas of society. Characters from Antigone by Sophocles and The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde both have trials and tribulations with societies. Throughout the entire play, Antigone battles with the fact that sometimes you have to make a difficult

  • Russell Jackson´s Review of The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

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    Russell Jackson asserts that in The Importance of Being Earnest, 'Wilde simultaneously engaged with and mocked the forms and rules of society' To what extent is Wilde's play critical of society? The Importance of Being Earnest: a Trivial Comedy for Serious People is a play written by, author, poet and playwright Oscar Wilde in 1894 and debuted at St James's Theatre in London in 1895. The Importance of Being Earnest is Wilde's most eminent work and renowned for its abundant quips and entertaining

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    The play The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde and the novella The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson showcase the Victorian era. With memorable characters like Aunt Augusta, accustomed to tea time and addicted to her cucumber sandwiches, and the loveable Dr. Jekyll, driven by his own devilish work, one is almost able to hear the trotting of horses with carriages on cobblestone streets. While the thought of high society and misty mornings is appealing, both

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    The Importance of Being Earnest, written by a fascinating Oscar Wilde reveals a story of social class and hierarchy during the roaring Victorian time period (1837-1901). Focusing his writing on the social classes, the play becomes comical when he exposes the flaws held by the upper class during this time. Wilde saw earnestness as being a key ideal in Victorian culture for much of British society struck Wilde as dry, stern, conservative, and so “earnestly” concerned with the maintenance of social

  • Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest Essay

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    Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest" In the closing lines of the first act of Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest," Algernon remarks, "I love scrapes. They are the only things that are never serious," to which Jack responds, "Oh, that's nonsense Algy. You never talk about anything but nonsense." Algernon caps off this exchange with a proclamation of the purpose of the whole work: "Nobody ever does" (1642). Wilde never allows anything in the work to conclude on a serious

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    An example of literature that reflects the queer phenomenon publically is presented in Oscar Wilde’s “The Importance of Being Earnest”. Besides the scenes where Algernon is shown eating muffins and cucumbers, to represent his inability to make a decision between men and women, there is an underlying theme of secrets and things that are kept hidden. The concept of bunburying was used as a coping method to deal with the pressure of societal standards. In order to save face and not look bad

  • The Importance Of Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    First and foremost, The Importance of Earnest is a comedy of manners as Oscar Wilde’s main premise is to satirise the behaviours of upper class Victorian society, as he knew it. In order to achieve this he created witty dialogue, ridiculed the institution of marriage and appealed, more, to the audience’s intelligence than their emotions. However, he also creates comedy by installing farcical features such as mistaken identity, physical humour and an absurd plot. Through the use of repartee (one

  • Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest Essay

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    Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest Webster’s dictionary defines earnest as “characterized by or proceeding from an intense and serious state of mind.” This definition is subject to total upheaval by Oscar Wilde in The Importance of Being Earnest. The title suggests a treatise on the value of solemnity in everyday life. However, Wilde presents us with an ironic play that leaves us with the opposite lesson. None of the characters benefit from propriety. The least serious characters

  • Satirical Comments in The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

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    individual’s future. In Victorian England, class diversity and class placement either hindered or enhanced people’s lives. One work of literature that comments on class distinctions in Victorian England is “The Importance of Being Earnest”, by Oscar Wilde. In “The Importance of Being Earnest”, Wilde expresses the concern with the Victorian people endeavoring to maintain an upper class reputation--while hiding the reality of their lives. The Victorian class system had an influential role on peoples lives

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Wilde

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    ‘The Importance of Being Earnest’, is utilised by Wilde to draw attention to the superficiality of the social facades predominantly maintained by the upper classes, through the physical depiction of Jack and Algernon’s aliases. Wilde further exemplifies his discontent with widespread social conventions at the time by satirising the arrogance of the aristocracy with a constant underlying representation of the lower classes as a more humble and less pretentious social division. Moreover, the playwright

  • The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

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    The huge issue that ‘The importance of being earnest’ raises is whether marriage was based on love or whether it was to just used to achieve a higher social status. Wilde portrays the different views on marriage through the characters of the play. Whilst Algernon is rather negative about marriage and doesn’t see it as anything more than a business deal, the character Gwendolyn seems to respect the values of marriage. Wilde keeps on ridiculing the social traditions and disposition of the noble class

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    The Importance of Being Earnest was one of the best comedy manner plays I have read thus far. The play was written by Oscar Wilde, which happened to be the best masterpiece he has ever written out of all four of his stage comedies. The Importance of Being Earnest was first published in 1899. This play was a self-parody and unreliably explanation on the dramatic farce genre for Wilde. This play is a comedy of manner during the Victorian Age. The Victorian Age was a period of peace and sensibility

  • Characters' Journey from Turmoil to Happiness in ‘The Importance of Being Earnest’ by Oscar Wilde

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    well to ‘The Importance of Being Earnest’ where Wilde proves that this comedy of manners does conform to this model since it traces the movement from distress to happiness. In this comedy of manners there is a movement from distress to happiness, even though some characters such as Algernon do not learn any lessons and stays ‘bad’. The character of Jack is presented as a questionable character as we don’t know if he has learnt anything seeing that he didn’t have to repent since Wilde constructed

  • Analysis of Oscar Wilde's 'The Importance of Being Earnest'

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    The Importance of Being Earnest: The Importance of Being Earnest is an unusual romantic comedy that was written by Oscar Wilde during the late 19th Century as an intelligent satire of Victorian society. Since then, the play has proven to be an unchanging hit because it has exceeded its initial demographic to an extent that it's regarded as the greatest stage comedy of all time. Wilde wrote the play not only to challenge received ideas in the then Victorian society but also to subvert prevailing

  • The Double Life in The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

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    The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde The Importance of Being Earnest appears to be a conventional 19th century farce. False identities, prohibited engagements, domineering mothers, lost children are typical of almost every farce. However, this is only on the surface in Wilde's play. His parody works at two levels- on the one hand he ridicules the manners of the high society and on the other he satirises the human condition in general. The characters in The Importance of Being Earnest

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    The Importance of Being Earnest is viewed as a standout amongst the best plays composed by Oscar Wilde, an incredible nineteenth century writer. Oscar Wilde manages something one of a kind about his contemporary age in this show. It addresses Victorian social issues, French theater, sham, social dramatization and acting. Every one of these factors influenced the structure of the play in a huge scale. This play is essentially a Victorian mocking dramatization displaying the social, political, monetary

  • The Importance of Being Earnest, by Oscar Wilde Essay

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    In The Importance of Being Earnest Oscar Wilde revealed that animalistic traits can tint a character’s intellectual attributes. All of the characters possess an overwhelming desire which seems to diminish their morality. Wilde uses Jack Worthing’s animalistic behaviors to reveal that his animal self is damaging his intellectual self. The play is presented to show that the characters retain an exaggerated pleasure with food, which shows their pleasures in inanimate objects. Every character in the

  • Analysis of The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wylde

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    Analysis of The Importance of Being Earnest: A Trivia Comedy for Serious People Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest is a satirical comedy, in which the characters create a double life to escape the burdens of the many social obligations imposed by late Victorian London society. The play repeatedly derides even the most sensitive social customs of the Victorian period, such as love and the institution of marriage. The protagonists, Algernon and Ernest, demonstrate Wilde’s suggestion of

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    Hidden Symbols in The Importance of Being Earnest The Importance of Being Earnest written by Oscar Wilde takes place in 1895 and exposes the hypocritical social expectations of the end of the Victorian era. During the Victorian period, marriage was about protecting your resources and keeping socially unacceptable impulses under control. The play undeniable reveals and focuses satire around differences between the behaviors of the upper class and that of the lower class. Oscar Wilde uses comedic symbolism

  • Shakespeare 's As You Like It And Oscar Wilde 's The Importance Of Being Earnest

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    definite and unyielding. The adherence to these social protocols was of utmost importance. Masculinity was viewed as being dominant, assertive, and bold, whereas femininity involved beauty, obedience, and chastity. The theatre became a method of challenging this rigid social concept. Both William Shakespeare’s As You Like It and Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest explore these public values through their characters. Wilde and Shakespeare’s use of gender reversals satirize the traditions of social

  • Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    In the novel The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde, Wilde quotes, “I hope [he] has not been leading a double life, pretending to be wicked and being good all the time. That would be hypocrisy.” Wilde’s quote is indirectly connected to the idea of moral ambiguity that The Scarlet Letter portrays. Nathaniel Hawthorne’s classic novel The Scarlet Letter depicts the actuality of romance, sin, and revenge rooted in the 17th century American society. Strong Puritan beliefs of the characters in

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    Satire in The Importance of Being Earnest The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde can be termed as a complete satirical work because of the path it chooses on harshly, but at the same time humorously criticizing and ridiculing social issues, such as marriage, wealth and death. The author approaches these issues with absurd mockery evidently with the intention of tickling his audience while driving his point home. Regarded as one of the most humorous and witty plays of all time, Oscar Wilde’s play

  • Oscar Wilde's The Importance Of Being Earnest Essay

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    In “The Importance of Being Earnest” by Oscar Wilde, humor functions through the use of Characterization and the social satire of the Victorian period. Characterization is the method an author uses to reveal or describe characters and their various personalities. Satire is a literary tone used to ridicule or make fun of human vice or weakness, often with the intent of correcting, or changing, the subject of the satirical attack. These two comical devices are part of the nature of humor, which is

  • The Importance of Being Earnest, by Oscar Wilde

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    The play, The Importance of Being Earnest, by Oscar Wilde was written in the Victorian Age of England. During this time morality was connected with sexual restraint and strict codes of conduct in public. This play hilariously critiques Victorian moral and social values while the characters in the play try to figure out the meaning of “earnestness”. Wilde uses humor and irony to publicly ridicule the self-aggrandizing attitude of the Victorian upper classes, as well as to expose their duplicity and

  • The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

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    Wilde’s ‘The Importance Of Being Earnest’ explores various themes of love and marriage, especially in Act 1, where marriage in Victorian society is widely contradicted as a ‘very pleasant state,’ instead using various comedic devises, such as puns, double entendres and inversions to mock its virtue and morality. Wilde creates comedy through the presentation of Victorian views on the functionality of marriage, ridiculing it as a social tool. The fact that Victorian society does not value the ‘love’

  • Satire in “The Importance of Being Earnest” by Oscar Wilde Essay example

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    piece of work that is designed to ridicule or tease a group or organization, generally for the purpose of being humorous. “The Importance of Being Earnest,” a play by Oscar Wilde, is a satire, ridiculing class, gender, and marriage. This essay will describe some points from each of these sections, as well as give a brief synopsis of the play these examples come from. The Importance of being Earnest includes three acts, with seven major characters. In act one, we start with a conversation between Jack

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    carrying yourself, many of which was not the must enjoyable of ways and lacked some fun that many need in their life. This forced many to split their Public life from the Private one. Written in the Victorian Era, the works of The importance of being earnest by Oscar Wilde, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson ,and Frankenstein by Mary Shelley displays how the characters need to keep be kept their Private lives separate from their Public lives in order to fit into their strict Victorian

  • The Dichotomy of Honesty in Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest

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    Oscar Wilde's, "The Importance of Being Earnest" revolves around the dichotomy of the true definition of honesty versus the victorian definition of honesty. It is apparent that Wilde's opinion is that true honesty is expressed through being genuine to one's self as opposed to putting on a front as is important in victorian ideals. In this work, Wilde uses humor to off-set the seriousness of the theme of the story. One who has studied this work can also clearly see that Wilde is using sarcasm to say

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    Social Status in Persuasion and The Importance of Being Earnest Social status refers to a person 's position or importance within a society. I have done some research and have acquired information over the way social status is addressed in both the writings of Jane Austen and Oscar Wilde. In the novel Persuasion we can see how the characters go beyond their means to uphold their title and social value. In the play The Importance of Being Earnest we can see how the social rank and wealth of a person

  • The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wylde

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    Through the comparison of education of the upper and lower classes, juxtaposition is interlaced throughout ‘The Importance of Being Earnest’. Lady Bracknell is the foremost character to portray this satirical technique, as she considers the upper class to be much more educated than the lower class, merely because of social status. “The whole theory of modern education is radically unsound. Fortunately in England, at any rate, education produces no effect whatsoever. If it did, it would prove a serious

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    appeared to be strict. The Importance of Being Earnest, by Oscar Wilde, a nineteenth century author who was one of the most acclaimed playwrights of his day, is a play set in the Victorian time period that demonstrates how trivial telling the truth was. Different characters throughout Wilde’s play establish their dishonestly through hiding who they really are and pretending to be someone whom they are not. In an essay titled “From ‘Oscar Wilde’s Game of Being Earnest,’” Tirthankar Bose describes

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    In the play by Oscar Wilde “The Importance of Being Earnest”, Wilde takes a comedic stance on a melodrama, portraying the duplicity of Victorian traditions and social values as the modernism of the twentieth century begins to emerge. The idea of the play revolves around its title of the characters discovering the importance of being earnest to their individual preferences. The author uses the traditional efforts of finding a marriage partner to illustrate the conflicting pressure of Victorian values

  • Oscar Wilde's The Importance Of Being Earnest Essay

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    Oscar Wilde's The Importance Of Being Earnest Oscar Wilde is a legendary author who has composed many great plays including The Green Carnation and A Woman of No Importance, however, The Importance of Being Earnest was undoubtedly the most famous of his works. First published in 1930, yet acknowledged since the late 1800s, The Importance of Being Earnest helped to revive the theater tradition of Congreve and Sheridan. The story is a comedic view of romance and the emphasis we place on seemingly

  • The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

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    ‘upper-class’ stature. The window must be open to let the bright sunlight enter the room. An intricate rug might cover the wooden floors. Books, paintings, and other decorative objects might be present to give the audience a sense of Algernon’s economic well-being. What is Algernon’s opinion of romance and marriage? Algernon is skeptical and cynical when it comes to romance and marriage. Several examples throughout Act 1 help support the claim that Algernon is against the concept of romance and marriage

  • Cloud Nine ' By Caryl Churchill And The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    cannot. This enables authors to explore various political issues in a more vivid way. In ‘Cloud Nine’ by Caryl Churchill and ‘The Importance of Being Earnest’ by Oscar Wilde, both authors explore ideas about gender in various ways. Churchill’s use of cross-dressing questions conventional ideas of the binary male and female sexes because it shows gender to be a construct. Wilde also inverts gender roles by showing how the main female figures exert power and control over the opposite sex. However, one could

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    “The Importance of Being Earnest,” a satirical play written by Oscar Wilde, discusses a vast variety of criticisms regarding the late Victorian societal period. In this comedic drama, focusing on and analyzing certain minor characters leads to a more effective interpretation of the messages attempting to be portrayed to the audience. For example, through the persona of Lady Bracknell, Wilde effectively mocks the concept of marriage for social status rather than love. Additionally, interpreting the

  • The Importance of Being Ernest by Oscar Wilde

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    “My dear Algy, you talk exactly as if you were a dentist. It is very vulgar to talk like a dentist when one isn't a dentist. It produces a false impression.” A quote from Jack in the play The Importance of Being Ernest. What does lying and false impression establish? Does it establish a sense of false impression as the statement itself indicates? Or what about a sense of establishing ones self in a way that creates a false light so as to look good to others in any given circumstance? Or just maybe

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    One of the most famous quotes from Oscar Wilde’s play, The Importance of Being Earnest is in the final act where Gwendolen and Cecily are discussing what they should do with Jack and Algernon. She claims that, “in matter of grave importance, style, not sincerity is the vital thing” (III, 19). This is the epitome of the story because it truly encompasses Wilde’s thoughts on Victorian life and society. Throughout the play, there are numerous instances where you can see that majority, if not all

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    Meghan DuPree English 2322 Bardenhagen Research Paper The Importance of Being Earnest In the play, The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde, there is a lot of humor that can be found. Specifically, developed behind the characters in this play that display many instances of irony and how important it was to fit into the “status quo” of this time period. There are specific behaviors from the characters of Lady Bracknell, Gwendolen, and Algernon that portray Wilde’s opinion of society during

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    The Importance of Being Earnest is a comedic play that was written by Oscar Wilde in the late 1800s. He believed that people in the Victorian Era took life too seriously. He wrote this play with various forms of satire to ridicule the strict lifestyle the upper-class were boxed into. The upper class had pretentious values and behaviors that characterized Victorian life. During the Victorian Era, people were living under Queen Victoria’s monarch. During her reign, “Queen Victoria, conveyed connotations

  • Oscar Wilde Constanly Mocks Victorian Society in the Importance of Being Earnest but Is Ultimately Approved

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    Act III offers happy resolution to the problems of identity and marriage that drive much of the humor in the previous acts. Wilde continues to mock the social customs and attitudes of the aristocratic class. He relentlessly attacks their values, views on marriage and respectability, sexual attitudes, and concern for stability in the social structure. Wilde attacks social behavior with the continuation of speeches by his characters that are the opposite of their actions. While Cecily and Gwendolen

  • William Wilde 's The Importance Of Being Earnest Essay

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    Humor in Wilde 's The Importance of Being Earnest. During the Victorian times, being proper, rich is very important. Having the right manners, reading the right things, marry the right person. Is big during this time period. They only talk about certain things in good company. They live on the right block, having the right clothing is very important. In Wilde Importance of being Earnest in the first scene there was humor in there. Algernon was stuffing his face. Wilde likes to make fun of all

  • The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

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    The Importance of Being Earnest Oscar Wilde’s comedy, The importance of Being Earnest, is a farcical critique of contemporary societal attitudes towards social institutions. The play is centered on the importance of the protagonists being called Earnest without actually being earnest. The Paradoxical structure of the play combines trivial situations with formal language to complicity ridicule traditional standards on issues like marriage and social class. These expectations are deemed meaningful

  • "The Importance of Being Earnest" by Oscar Wilde: Algernon Montcrieff - A Character Analysis

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    It is a well known phenomenon that many authors' lives are reflected through a character in their work. In Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest, the double life, or double identity, can be seen as the central metaphor in the play, epitomized in Algernon's creation of "Bunbury" or "Bunburying". As this term is the only fictitious word employed throughout the text, it is crucial to critically analyze not only its use and implications, but more importantly, the character who coins the term;

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    Earnest Hypocrisy In Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest, two gentlemen exemplify the result of dishonesty and hypocrisy. Set in Victorian England, the two bachelors, Algernon and Jack, fight over which one of them will take the name Ernest in order to win their own girl. Wilde circumvents conventionalism and employs superior satirical strategy to not only teach the importance of being earnest, a characteristic held dear by Victorian society, but he also chastises his world for the hypocrisy

  • General Structure of Comedy and the Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

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    General Structure of Comedy and the Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde GeneralStructure of Comedy: * Things start out badly and end well * The deeper aim is broadly social: the kingdom or other city space is at first badly ruled or in turmoil for some reason--perhaps the values and institutions of the citizens and/or rulers are in need of some re-examination. * Next, the main characters leave (willingly or otherwise) the city setting and wind up in the countryside

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    In order to fully understand the meaning of “The Importance of Being Earnest” and its importance in its time, one must look at Oscar Wilde’s background in relation to the Victorian time period. Biography.com states that Wilde had a very social life, growing up among influential Victorians and intellectuals of the time. As he grew older and became a successful writer, he began engaging in homosexual affairs which was a crime during the 19th century. He eventually started a relationship with Alfred

  • An Analysis Of Oscar Wilde S The Importance Of Being Honest

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    Chiderah Onyeukwu Professor Daniel Galvin English 213 18 April 2013 Role of Marriage in Importance of Being Earnest The Importance of Being Earnest, Oscar Wilde’s last and most famous play, debuted in London on February 14, 1895. Throughout the play, one major theme seems to override the others. That theme is the role of marriage; the question of whether marriage as an institution is “pleasant” or “unpleasant” comes up repeatedly. It seems as if every character has a strong stance on the role of

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    ‘The Importance of Being Earnest’ by Oscar Wilde is a play which contain the lies of Jack and Algernon and how that affects the attitudes of their beloved Gwendolen and Cecily and ‘The Picture of Dorian Gray’ by Oscar Wilde is about the lives of three men Basil, Lord Henry, and Dorian Gray and it also includes how people were hypocritical towards Victorian ethics. In the book ‘The Picture of Dorian Gray’, Lord Henry said, “We are punished for our refusals. Every impulse that we strive to strangle

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

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    Oscar Wilde’s, The Importance of Being Earnest, is a satirical play for earnest people. Wilde uses witty and humor through analogies or metaphors to address matters such as marriage and class structure. Wild’s play is much of a satirical attack toward the higher class in a Victorian society. The Importance of Being Earnest, acts as a storyline of living a double life. Jack and Algernon claim to be an ideal figure, Ernest, whom which attracts women. Both characters, living the double life, tend to