Prion Diseases Essay

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    Essay on Prion Diseases

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    Prion Diseases Abstract Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are neurodegenerative diseases that are thought to be caused by the misfolding of prion proteins. Prions are able to replicate in the absence of nucleic acids. TSEs include: scrapie, bovine spongiform encephalopathy, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, kuru, Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease, and Fatal Familial Insomnia. They can affect many different animals, including humans. Currently, there are no ways to diagnose, treat

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    TSE: Unique Neuroinvasive Pathogens Overview Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), also referred to as prion diseases, are a range of progressive neurodegenerative diseases that affect various mammals, including humans. These diseases are caused by exposure to prions, infectious agents that result from the misfolded form of a glycoprotein found at the surface of cells: PrPc. The abnormal variant (PrPSc) is highly resistant to heat, chemicals and disinfection procedures such as formalin

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    Prion Disease

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    Despite some speculation of scientific findings in regards to prion conversion, research continues. The prion disease, unlike other infectious diseases such as viruses or bacteria, cannot be diagnosed using PCR, cell culture assays, or serology attributable to lack of nucleic acids, which are not recognized by normal host immune responses. Also, owing to uneven distribution throughout the body, finding a tool that can be used on the central nervous system may be easier said than done (25). The

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    Prion disease, also known as a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), was first seen in 1902 within a linguistic group in Papa New Guinea, called the Fore. This human form of prion disease is called kuru and around the 1950’s, it proved to be untreatable and always fatal to those infected by it. At its peak, kuru reached epidemic levels as 200 new cases of kuru were reported annually during the mid-1950’s, contributing to greatly to its death toll of 3000 people (Goldfarb, 2002). The Fore

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    consider to be killer proteins. These proteins are called prions. Prions are a particularly interesting type of protein just in the fact that they have the ability to misfold on their own and also to become infectious agents. In simplest terms the prion proteins misfold, forming an abnormally shaped protein. These abnormal protein plaques then begin building up and forming clumps inside the brain which damage and destroy the brains neurons. This disease process progresses relatively

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    Prions cause diseases, but they aren’t viruses or bacteria or fungi or parasites, but proteinaceous infectious particles, an abnormal form of a normally harmless protein found in the brain causing variety of fatal neurological diseases of both animals and humans. They are the ones that cause the well-known “mad cow” disease in Britain and “Scarpie” for animals. Prions act slowly, and are virtually indestructible. Prions enter the brain through infection, or they can arise from mutations in the gene

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    Prions Disease Summary

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    Prions Disease Summary- Alex Schray Causes: Prion diseases are caused by proteinaceous infectious particles (more commonly referred to as prions). According to the CDC the term prion “refers to abnormal, pathogenic agents that are transmissible and are able to induce abnormal folding of specific normal cellular proteins.” Prions are always contracted one of three different ways. They can develop sporadically through a sudden genetic mutation. They can be inherited; prions are autosmol dominant,

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    Sign Prion Disease

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    Prions: What they are and what they are not There are many neurological diseases in the world. Many are ones we have found cures for or at lease have treatment to help with symptoms. Prions are much different than that. Prions come from the two worlds Protein and Infection. This disease is the combination of both proteins and infections cause spongiform encephalopathies. This translates to “holes in the brain”. Prion diseases have many names depending on what sort of mammal that infect. Creutzfeldt-Jakob

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    Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease is a rare neurodegenerative disorder that is caused by a unique infectious agent called prion. It is neither a virus or bacteria and is not even a living organism but purely a protein that infects the brain causing neuro-degradation and eventually death. CJD is the human disorder from a family of prion diseases which have also been found in animals such as sheep called Scrapie Disease, cattle known as Bovine Spongiform Encephalitis, and deer named Chronic Wasting Disease (Anderson

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    affects the coronary arteries it will cause coronary artery disease, which puts a person at risk for having a heart attack. When atherosclerosis affects the blood vessels that supply the brain it will cause cerebral vascular disease, which puts a person at risk of having a stroke. Atherosclerosis may also block blood flow to other vital organs, including the kidneys and intestines. On the other side, too little cholesterol can also cause diseases to a person. Low levels of LDL cholesterol may increase

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