Stephen Crane Blue Hotel Essay

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    example, Stephen Crane’s widely read short story, “The Blue Hotel”, exhibits many situations where discrimination drives the plot forward. Within the first few paragraphs of “The Blue Hotel,” the reader is promptly introduced to a situation in which discrimination occurs, due to the description of the Palace Hotel. The author, Stephen Crane, describes the color scheme of the hotel, which points out how different the hotel is to the rest of the town, and proceeds to write that “The Palace Hotel, then

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    Analysis of The Blue Hotel by Stephen Crane "The Blue Hotel" by Stephen Crane is a story about three travelers passing through Fort Romper, Nebraska. Pat Scully, the owner of the Palace Hotel, draws the men to his hotel that is near the train station. In the hotel the three men meet Johnnie, son of Scully, and agree to play a game of cards with him. During the game, the Swede declares Johnnie as a cheater; this gives rise to a fistfight between Johnnie and the Swede. The Swede wins the fight but

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    Hinduism. Writer Stephen Crane, a student of Vedanta tradition, interprets the concept of karma in his story “The Blue Hotel”. Crane shows how one incident can backfire in one’s life, basically proving how karma played a role in the Swede’s death. Crane shows how the Swede believed in the myth of the West by reading novels of the West and not by his personal own experience which made him alert and fearful. Some readers of “The Blue Hotel” might see it as mindlessly violent. However Crane depicts violence

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    The Blue Hotel

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    Within a letter written to a friend Stephen Crane once wrote “ I always want to be unmistakeable”. (Greenfield 564) Crane wanted his short stories and poems to be read and understood by all men. Despite criticism Crane enjoyed writing, and later wrote to another friend “ my chiefest desire was to write plainly and unmistakeably so that all men (and some women) might read and understand” (Greenfield 562) Crane was a modern writer “He rejected both the theism and humanism of the nineteenth century”

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    Man and Nature in The Blue Hotel and The Open Boat      Stephen Crane uses a massive, ominous stove, sprawled out in a tiny room and burning with "god-like violence," as a principal metaphor to communicate his interpretation of the world. Full of nearly restrained energy, the torrid stove is a symbol of the burning, potentially eruptive earth to which humans "cling" and of which they are a part. As a literary naturalist, Crane interpreted reality from a Darwinian perspective, and saw

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    Importance of Setting in Stephen Crane's The Blue Hotel    In  'The Blue Hotel,' Stephen Crane uses various provocative techniques to ensure that the setting adds to the richness of the story. 'The Blue Hotel' is set in a cold Nebraska town at the Palace Hotel in the late 1800's, but there is more to setting than just when and where a story takes place.  In a written work, it is the author's job to vividly depict events in order to keep the reader?s attention and to create colorful mental

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    Stephen Crane is an American writer who wrote the poem, In the Desert. Stephen Crane was born on November 1, 1871, in Newark, New Jersey. He was inspired to write by his family. His father was a Methodist minister, two out of his fourteen siblings were journalists and his mother wrote religious articles about social concerns. He died on June 5, 1900, in Badenweiler, Germany because he paid little attention to his health and contracted tuberculosis. Crane was an active writer during the 1890s, writing

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    Color Symbolism in Blue Hotel, Black Cat, Night, Alfred Prufrock, Red Wheelbarrow       Symbolism of colors is evident in much of literature. "The Blue Hotel" by Stephen Crane, "The Black Cat" of Edgar Allan Poe, "Night" by William Blake, "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" by T. S. Eliot, and "The Red Wheelbarrow" by William Carlos Williams encompass examples of color symbolism from both the prose and the poetry of literature. When drawing from various modes of psychology, interpretations

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    Ambrose Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” and Stephen Crane’s “The Blue Hotel” are both examples of Naturalistic writing. Both stories end with a man dying violently, though death seems to be avoidable in both cases to demonstrate Naturalism, and the idea of survival of the fittest through writing. Though Peyton Farquhar, and the Swede have free will their free will can be dangerous to themselves especially when not paired with rational thought. The human condition is one of misery, either

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    The Blue Hotel Essay

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    The Collation of Stephen Crane and Bret Harte Stephen Crane’s short story, The Blue Hotel, is a very diverse and interesting story with many themes. One of the themes is consequences for your actions. In the story a man they called the Swede went to a bar and tried to force a Gambler to drink with him. He kept pushing and wouldn’t leave the man alone resulting the Swede being killed. Another theme in this short story is honesty. During the Story the Swede claimed while playing cards that another

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