Strain Theory Essay

Sort By:
Page 1 of 50 - About 500 essays
  • Decent Essays

    means, the structural strain theory has occurred. A mismatch that occurs between legitimate means and socially-promoted goals has a typology of responses in the strain theory. Merton’s typology extends the functionalist perspective. He believed that larger deviancy rates were because of social conditions and the varying responses. One of the responses to social strain that accepts legitimate means of pursuing socially-promoted goals is conformity. Another response to social strain is ritualism. People

    • 1040 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Theory on Terrorism Annotated Bibliography Agnew, R. (2010). "A general strain theory of terrorism." Theoretical Criminology 14(2): 131-153. This article critiques recent works on terrorism that use the strain theory. They use their own research to create the general strain theory of terrorism. There are general strains and collective strains. These collective strains are what leads to and increases the liklihood of terrorism. Berrebi, C., & Ostwald, J. (2011). Earthquakes, hurricanes, and terrorism:

    • 715 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Criminologic theorists use one another’s work to develop theories further and apply them to different societies and times. The labelling theory has a small group of key theorists behind it, originating from a sociological influence on deviance (Goode (A) 2016, 64). In 1963 Howard Becker published Outsiders which articulated his theory of labelling (Becker 1963) (Hayes 2015, 244). Though the 1960s saw labelling theory rise and Becker is credited with the theory, there were three earlier works that laid a pathway

    • 1397 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Other than that research, Todd Sandler (2013) saw the correlation between the Terrorism & Game Theory, as he explains:” Game theory shows how terrorists exploit asymmetric warfare to their strategic advantage. Terrorist networks allow terrorists to deploy their ‘‘best-shot’’ effort against targeted countries whose lack of cooperation means that there are always soft targets or the weakest links for terrorists to attack for maximum gain. In addition, terrorists choose an optimal risk-minimizing network

    • 1129 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Identify the key aspects of Robert Merton’s ‘strain theory’. It was a powerful statement focussing on the social causes of crime but what were its limitations? This essay is going to demonstrate an understanding of Robert Merton’s strain theory, the advantages of the Strain theory and also the disadvantages of the theory. Robert Merton (1910) best known for developing theories of deviance. Robert Merton is considered to be one of the most influential social scientists. Merton’s work is highly

    • 1017 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Agnew’s general strain theory Jason A. Ford, Ryan D. Schroeder, and Hilary M. Dotson explore the obesity and substance use in the September 1, 2014 article, Weight Strain and Binge Drinking among adolescents. The researches believed that general strain theory contributed to obesity and substance abuse. According to the articles authors, “Research has also shown that both alcohol and high calorie foods are frequently used to control emotional reactions.” Now when you look at strain theory through the

    • 998 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Good Essays

    even why something is. In the case of criminology the main question being asked is “why does crime occur?”, but some theories also attempt to answer another equally interesting question “if being a criminal is the easy choice, why are so many people law abiding?” in order to understand criminal behavior. In order for a hypothesis to be moved forward into the category of a theory it must first be tested, and those tests must be able to be reconfirmed. In the case of criminology most of this testing

    • 957 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Decent Essays

    3.2 Strain Theory Strain theory suggested that crime is kind of adaptation to strain (Cullen & Wilcox, 2010). Merton (1938) highlighted that individuals who are unable to attain conventional goals through legitimate means, like attaining higher status by having a good job, may give up on legitimate means (Fox & Levin, 2014). They may turn to attain their “success” by engaging in criminal behaviors (Fox & Levin, 2014). Agnew (1992) added that difficulties met in social relationships at home and

    • 805 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Better Essays

    Introduction The Cultural Strain Theory states that persons of different cultures have a harder time developing relationships, than persons of the same culture. There are many different theories that reveal the terms and aspects that are needed to develop a relationship. Reducing one’s uncertainty towards the other, having low levels of anxiety, and being able to relate to the relationship partner are all vital to developing a relationship. There are three theories that address these three relationship

    • 1340 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Decent Essays

    data on crime and criminal behavior. As I learned about criminology I learned that there are several theories that come along with it. The two theories in criminology that stood out the most to me were social strain theory and rational choice theory. These theories stood out to me because I felt like these were two that I can truly see how the people who developed them came about. Social strain theory was created by Robert Merton in the 1940s. Robert Merton is a very famous sociologist who accomplished

    • 1889 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
Previous
Page12345678950