The Chrysalids Essay

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    Change In The Chrysalids

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    The views of change in Waknuk and Zealand are conflicting. While one embraces change and thinks that it is essential in life the other frowns upon change and believes that it is the devil working. In the sci-fi novel The Chrysalids by John Wyndham, David and other children have telepathic abilities, but living in Waknuk, a rural Christian town, deviations are outlawed, causing the group to keep their abilities to themselves. Petra, the strongest member of the group, begins to communicate with a far

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    The Chrysalids by John Wyndham is a science fiction novel that sets place in the future long after a nuclear holocaust has devastated large areas of the world. The stories focal point is on the people in a group of highly intellectual people that are compelled to leave and go to the story calls “The Fringes”. This is a place where people who do not fit God’s true image go. What this means is, is if you have any type of deviation, you will be considered abnormal. The novel is written in first person

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    Set in the near future of a post-apocalyptic world, The Chrysalids by John Wyndham, follows humanity decades after as it continues to rebuild from a tribulation believe to have been sent by God to punish sinners of the past. The inhabitants of this dystopian society are left with little knowledge of their past, with only a copy of the Bible and its Repentances left by the past inhabitants, to give them a sense of direction. Wyndham presents the Waknuks (a small community living in this post tribulation

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    In The Chrysalids, by John Wyndham, there are three main themes expressed through three characters. The first theme is expressed through David. David is an important character because he shows us the idea of acceptance. This is shown when David finds about Sophie’s sixth toe when she injured her ankle, and still wants to be her friend despite her being a deviation. In Wanuk - the place where David lives- deviations, like Sophie, are not accepted are human. David mentions multiple times that he

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    Herman Jian Ms. Smurthwaite ENG1D1-01 27 November 2017 Maturity and Growth in The Chrysalids A person is generally considered to be mature if they exhibit common qualities or characteristics that are expected in adulthood. These characteristics can include being responsible, patient, and making decisions based on rationality. In the novel The Chrysalids by John Wyndham, we get to see how the young adolescent characters mature throughout the novel. Wyndham challenges his characters by putting them

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    In our film, we attempted to portray John Wyndham’s “The Chrysalids” to the best of our ability, while retaining as much of the dystopian elements that are intrinsic to the story as possible. The book takes place in the town of Waknuk, where the protagonist, David, is taught from a young age not to deviate from the norm. In accordance with the Waknukian religion, anyone whose body contravenes with the Definition of Man is a Blasphemy, and must be isolated, alienated and even banished from their pure

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    The Chrysalids is a novel that appears to be set in the future after a terrible nuclear war. The title of book symbolizes the biological term Chrysalis, which is the third stage in the metamorphosis of a butterfly, also called the pupae, characterized by immobility. Joseph Strorm is the main antagonist character of the Waknuk community and signifies the skin of the pupas. Throughout the novel, his beliefs and actions lead to the extension of the chrysalis stage. The rest of the community embodies

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    Chrysalids essay                                 Kaden I think the author added rebellion of culture as a theme because we’re so used to following our ways and not rebelling against culture and it mixes us up from what we’re used too and intrigues us. I think the author hints that rebelling is acceptable in the novel so that we think about it and decide if it actually is. In the chrysalids rebellion happens because if a person is being harmed or discriminated in an unfair manner they are allowed

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    In the novel The Chrysalids by John Wyndham, the readers are introduced to traditions and strict social agreements in Waknuk which lead to unfortunate destructions of their people. The Waknukians only accept those who resemble God’s image, which is a human without deformities unlike Sophie, who has six toes; the blind acceptance of traditions leads to the ruination of the Waknuk society of The Chrysalids. Due to strict laws, everyone is intensely devout in their religious beliefs and follows exactly

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    Is there really one certain way God meant for people to be? Or are all people part of His image in different ways? Well in the novel The Chrysalids the image of God, as reflected in Nicholson's Repentances, seems to agree with the first option. The image of God within this novel demands very strict guidelines. Due to these guidelines this image seems to discriminate against others who are not perfect in their eyes. If a person does not meet the requirements dictated by the image of God as stated

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