Zapatista Essay

Sort By:
Page 1 of 12 - About 119 essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Zapatistas, rebelled in Chiapas, Mexico. They are an indigenous armed group army of women that declared war on the mexican government and demanded to get: food health, independence, liberty etc. They are also considered a terrorist group since they rebel against the government. The zapatistas are a group of women,. Most of the zapatistas were indigenous as women and men. Their goals were to better the economy they were living in, they wanted to end illiteracy, find jobs for indigenous people

    • 657 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Zapatista Resistance

    • 930 Words
    • 4 Pages

    relation of the Zapatista insurgency, Jeff Conant approaches the Zapatista revolution from a very particular point of view, focusing in the public image of this group in order to explain their strategies to be publicly active in national and international spaces and the importance of this aspect on the revolution for its self-protection and survival. In this book, Conant highlights the importance of the use of symbolisms, metaphors and other literary resources used in the Zapatista public speeches

    • 930 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Better Essays

    Zapatista History

    • 2953 Words
    • 12 Pages

    Chiapas suspected of supporting the Zapatista rebels (EZLN). When President Zedillo tried to solve the "Chiapas problem" in February 1995 by launching a military attack, domestic and international criticism forced him to

    • 2953 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Zapatista Movement

    • 761 Words
    • 4 Pages

    and the ethnic movement. Sometimes these ethnic movements choose to redefine their ethnic identities, and by doing so they “reconstruct the already distinct socio-economic-political position of the group” (Tilley 509). This could be applied to the Zapatista movement as a whole as the motives that surrounded initial uprising was because of land issues and the belief in self-determination. The location of the Chiapas is what supports the reconstruction idea because of how the Mexican state viewed that

    • 761 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Good Essays

    Essay on Zapatista Movement in Mexcio

    • 1273 Words
    • 6 Pages
    • 12 Works Cited

    The Zapatista rebellion in Chiapas, Mexico got worldwide attention on January 1, 1994, when they marched to Mexico City against the signing of the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The free trade agreement was intended to facilitate trading between Canada, United States, and Mexico. The Zapatista claimed that this agreement would affect the indigenous people of Chiapas by further widening the gap between the poor and the rich. In this paper I will examine the NAFTA agreement and the

    • 1273 Words
    • 6 Pages
    • 12 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Successes and Failures of the Zapatista Movement On January 1, 2004, over one thousand people in the mountain hamlet of Oventic, Chiapas, celebrated the 10th anniversary of the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) rebellion with song and dance. Thus, it seems a fitting time to take stock of the successes and failures of the Zapatista movement in the context of its original goals. While the EZLN has been able to establish thirty eight autonomous indigenous communities in Chiapas

    • 1863 Words
    • 8 Pages
    • 16 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Martin Cueto Jr Geography 101 Stateless nation 2 March, 2015 Zapatistas The Zapatista people were formed in a jungle in Chiapas, Mexico where they started to grow in numbers and started forming a small rural town. They are a movement, they are a revolution. The Zapatistas are men, women and children. The Zapatistas are farmers they call the earth their mother and call themselves the people of corn. The Zapatistas are indigenous Mayan people whom speak many languages and come from many cultures.

    • 1535 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Decent Essays

    sudden all you here is a group called the Zapatista Movement. The movement was recognized all over the world in a matter of a day January 1st of 1994, the indigenous farmers of southern Mexico took arms and declared autonomy from the Mexican State. This radical uprising was in response to the globalization and free trade agreement, more in particular The North American Free Trade Agreement that was in effect on January 1st of 1994 as was the movement. The Zapatista Movement response to the Free Trade Agreement

    • 655 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    peasant followers, Orozco, however stayed true to his art style by creating symbolic and caricaturist images which depicted the struggles and suffering of Zapata and the Zapatistas (his followers). In the painting, Zapatistas, Orozco depicts Zapatista and his peasant followers going into their last battle in Morelos. In Morelos, Zapatistas lost many of his followers and also succumb to his injuries and died. The painting’s scene may have

    • 422 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Good Essays

    Democratic Theory In 1993 The Revolutionary Woman’s Law was adopted into the Zapatistas movement, this law challenged the norms and traditions of a patriarchy society (Basu 2010, 323). The women collectively wrote the law based on their shared experiences. The women’s request were that they had the right to choose who to marry, when to marry, whether they would have children, and how many, and how they would participate in society. This new law legitimized women as equals with men. Rosalva Castillo

    • 1650 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
Previous
Page12345678912