African Writers Series

Page 1 of 50 - About 500 essays
  • Battle Royal, And The Planon By Ralph Ellison's The Lesson

    2010 Words  | 9 Pages

    this, the author is defending the African race by claiming that the punishment for the actions of their ancestors should not be burdened with them. We read that the sons of a black person’s master will sometimes want to help rise and benefit the individual. Du Bois claims, “National opinion has enabled this last class to maintain the Negro common schools, and to protect the Negro partially in property, life, and limb” (1166). This tells readers that the African race is beginning to receive their

  • Comparing In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens and I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

    1145 Words  | 5 Pages

    In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens and I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings       Alice Walker and Maya Angelou are two contemporary African-American writers.  Although almost a generation apart in age, both women display a remarkable similarity in their lives.  Each has written about her experiences growing up in the rural South, Ms. Walker through her essays and Ms. Angelou in her autobiographies.  Though they share similar backgrounds, each has a unique style which gives to us, the readers

  • Taking a Look at African American Poets

    827 Words  | 3 Pages

    ring bells when African American poets are mentioned? The legends who have influenced the path in which our ancestors fought hard to obtain in past generations. Booker T. Washington, Rita Dove, Richard Wright, Zora Hurston and Langston Hughes were a few among various highly influential poets during the 1900s. One of the biggest accomplishments of blacks today is that literature has developed from these African American poets. These individuals have set a tone and path to allow writers of any ethnicity

  • Similarities Between Alice Walker And Maya Angelou

    1074 Words  | 5 Pages

    Alice Walker and Maya Angelou are two contemporary African-American writers. Although almost a generation apart in age, both women display a remarkable similarity in their lives. Each has written about her experiences growing up in the rural South, Ms. Walker through her essays and Ms. Angelou in her autobiographies. Though they share similar backgrounds, each has a unique style that gives the readers, the gift of their exquisite humanity, with all of its frailties and strengths, joys and sorrows

  • Examples Of Torture And Into The Dark Chamber

    951 Words  | 4 Pages

    the writer the deeper problem is not to allow himself to be impaled on the dilemma proposed by the state, namely, either to ignore its obscenities or else to produce representations of them. The true challenge is: how not to play the game by the rules of the state, how to establish one’s own authority, how to imagine torture and death on one’s own terms. (Coetzee ed. Atwell, Doubling the Point 364)

  • Figurative Language In The King Of The Bingo Game

    871 Words  | 4 Pages

    Jamaica Kincaid's short story Girl and Ralph Ellison's King of the Bingo Game display prejudices, insecurities, and African Americans' struggle to find their own identity in the mid to late 1900s. In Girl, an unnamed daughter receives critical instructions and harsh advice from her mother about how to take care of a home, behave like a respectful woman, and have a proper, loving relationship. In the King of the Bingo Game, an unnamed middle-aged man plays a bingo game that will determine his well-being

  • The Political, Feminist, and Religious view of Frances E.W. Harper, Phllis Wheatley, and Alice Dunbar-Nelson

    2661 Words  | 11 Pages

    poignant authors whose works have remained influential throughout time. Feminism, politics, and religion are three aspects evident in their personal lives an d literature. Wheatley was considered a feminist icon because she was the first published African American female poet. However, her writing did not deal with feminist issues, rather, they focussed on religious and political themes. Unlike Wheatley, Harper's femi nist views are incorporated into her work. She uses religion as a method to express

  • The Coming Of Age Essay

    1184 Words  | 5 Pages

    to work at it, but not as in individual but as a whole, a class. The only way for them to make a difference to change societies view of their class and become part of the rest of societies.      In 'Girl'; Kincaid lists a series of orders from a mother to a daughter in such a way that the characters' lives are illuminated and transformed by the mundane household details. The 'Girl'; is more of a gender type of a story, but there is also a lesson that needs to be realized

  • “Whenever my environment had failed to support or nourish me, I had clutched at books...” ― Richard

    800 Words  | 4 Pages

    “Whenever my environment had failed to support or nourish me, I had clutched at books...” ― Richard Wright, Black Boy this is a quote from the famous Richard Wright an African American author. This quote means that no matter what was placed in his way or what he lacked that others had he hung on to what he had and did what he could. And the more he read about the world, the more he longed to see it and make a permanent break from the Jim Crow South. "I want my life to count for something," he told

  • Analysis Of Maya Angelou 's ' Champion Of The World '

    1474 Words  | 6 Pages

    Angelou uses descriptive language to draw the readers in, she gives detail by detail of how the boxing match took place and all the emotions that were running through her. For the most part the writer is credible, she explains how the black community in her town came together to listen to the radio, but after some research it was found that Joe Louis and Primo Carnera only fought once and it was not a championship fight. Perhaps she was referring

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