Azar Nafisi

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    In the memoir Reading Lolita in Tehran by Azar Nafisi and the novel Revolutionizing Motherhood: The Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo written by Guzman Bouvard, the repressive revolutions played a pivotal role in the lives of women. Through the Iranian Revolution, restrictions in the public and private sphere were evident by imposing censorship constrains. The Argentinian revolution, on the other hand, allowed limited civil rights by actions of the military junta. Despite these conditions, women managed

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    well as a deep exploration of the Islamic revolution in Iran while showing how it affected a university professor and her students. In “ Reading Lolita in Teheran” Nafisi is looking for a way to escape reality and find out if art can be more powerful than a dictatorship. Because of her deep passion for literature and reading, Nafisi chooses to teach a sampling of world’s greatest literature to seven of her most committed female students. Thus, every Thursday morning they gather in order to read

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    Memoir In Books” chronicles the life of Azar Nafisi, (a Professor of English), during her years in the Islamic Republic of Iran. The novel documents Nafisi’s experiences while teaching during the Iranian Revolution in the Islamic Republic of Iran, and her life there until abandoning her home for America in 1997. Much of the book focuses on Nafisi as a professor at the University of Tehran, and, (after her expulsion from there), the Allameh Tabatabai University. Nafisi begins telling her story by sharing

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    In both, Azar Nafisi’s, “Reading Lolita in Tehran,” and Ethan Watters’, “The Mega-Marketing of Depression in Japan” there is an overlap on the themes of cultural narratives and personal choices. In “Reading Lolita in Tehran,” Azar Nafisi illustrates her class meeting with her girls, who are driven to learn about the relation between fantasy and reality. The Islamic State – the high force – in this selection, rules over the girls and Nafisi reveals the emotions and enhances her girls’ reactions to

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    Up Tuesday Morning, It Was Friday,” she recounts her patients ' personal traumatic experiences in the form of story to provide her readers a sharper understanding of what these experiences entail. Similarly, Azar Nafisi recounts her experiences in vivid detail through a narrative. In Nafisi 's “Selections from Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books,” her rough experiences in Tehran become fully pronounced as she describes her conflict with clashing cultures through a series of firsthand

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    Nafisi

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    revolution, a young woman named Azar Nafisi started teaching at the University of Tehran. However, in 1981, Nafisi was expelled from the University of Tehran for refusing to wear an Islamic veil. Seven years later, however, she did indeed resume teaching but soon resigned in protest over the increasingly cruel punishments of the Iranian government toward women. She dreamed of working with students that carried a great passion for learning. In Reading Lolita in Tehran, Azar Nafisi and her seven students join

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    Lolita 's Tehr A Memoir

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    the life of Azar Nafisi, a Professor of English, during her years in the Islamic Republic of Iran. As described in its ' title, the novel is a “Memoir in Books” that chronicles Azar Nafisi’s experiences while teaching during the Iranian Revolution in the Islamic Republic of Iran, and her life there until leaving for America in 1997. Much of the book focuses on Nafisi as a professor at the University of Tehran, and, (after her expulsion from there), the Allameh Tabatabai University. Nafisi begins with

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    to. Although there is no shortage of methods to contribute to or initiate change, it can be surprising that even something as asomatous as literature can cause or inspire change. The narratives of authors Azar Nafisi and Ethan Watters are prime examples of literature affecting change. Azar Nafisi, author of “Reading Lolita in Tehran,” uses her literary piece to depict the struggles some people in the world can go through and how they can stay strong and make the smallest change that means the world

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    Maggie Nelson, Azar Nafisi, and Tim O’Brien explore the effect of political and ideological contexts on various forms of art and the way they are created or viewed. In “Great to Watch,” Nelson criticizes the media for not considering the barrier that exists between those who are educated in understanding art and and those who are not because she finds that the people who are not well informed become “desensitized” to what they see. Throughout her story, “Reading Lolita in Tehran,” Nafisi explains the

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    Lolita In Tehran

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    is the fight that people of the past and the present are trying to win. A fight where the result are endless options. In the texts “I have a dream” by Martin Luther King Jr, “Persepolis 2” by Marjane Satrapi, and “Reading Lolita in Tehran” by Azar Nafisi the demand for freedom is shown through the thoughts and worries of the people. Martin Luther King Jr believes that people of colors haven’t really been given freedom, even though they’re no longer slaves. In his speech Luther King made a very

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