Charles Carroll of Carrollton

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  • Life And Actions Of Charles Carroll Of Carrollton

    1115 Words  | 5 Pages

    The life and actions of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, including his wealth and business skills, and his active patriotism, positively affected American life in early American times, as well as today. The Carrollton family legacy and wealth influenced Charles in his upbringing; Charles’ parents instilled within him an appreciation for business, and he later became a talented businessman, providing jobs and opportunities for others. He was also actively involved in politics and patriotism, despite

  • Biography Of Eleanor Darnall Carroll

    378 Words  | 2 Pages

    ' home was Darnall's Chance, a plantation of 27,000 acres which his mother, Eleanor Darnall Carroll, had inherited from her grandfather.[2] His younger brother John was the first Roman Catholic bishop in the United States (as Archbishop of Baltimore, 1790) and founder of Georgetown University; his cousin Charles Carroll of Carrollton signed the Declaration of Independence. Carroll was sent abroad for his education. Between 1742 and 1748 he and John studied under the Jesuits at the College of St.

  • John Wilkes Booths Assassination Of The Carrolton Inn

    536 Words  | 3 Pages

    corner of Fayette and Front street sits Shot Tower (the lead shot manufacturing facility from 1828 to 1892). Further down, moving east, past the Flag House (home of the Star-spangled Banner Flag), past the Carrolton Inn (“winter home of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, signer of the Declaration of Independence”), down the street is, the President Street Station, converted to a museum. A Civil War museum about a mile away from a large white house of worship. According to the historian at the museum. The

  • The Declaration of Independence of the United States of America

    3256 Words  | 14 Pages

    IN CONGRESS, July 4, 1776. The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America, When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation

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