Creole Essay

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    Creole Culture

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    never ascribed them directly to one culture. After reflection, I realized most of the practices my family participates in comes from the creole culture. Both of my parents grew up in Louisiana so Mardi Gras, giving up a habit in honor of Lent, listening to creole based music, and happily consuming gumbo, jambalaya, and beignets were a common. Unlike the creole people, I am not a Roman Catholic. Growing up, my family was not involved with the church, that being I rarely went. While my parents did

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    This is how Pidgin and Creole languages have evolved. The objective of this paper is to show that Pidgin and Creole languages are very complex and compelling, and it is clear that new things are being discovered about these languages at a continual rate. Subsequently, they are very adaptable to times of change, which is likely an indication of its user both yesterday and presently. The central question here is: how did Pidgin and Creole languages develop? Pidgins and Creole languages are used in

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    In our world today Creole has begun to be explained through the modern sense in the medium of Rhythm and Blues. Creole has various functions including creole as a(n): process, music, food, religion, geography and condition. All of these functions contribute to the greater creole identity. Overtime the meaning of what it means to be Creole has changed and involved. It was once a word defining people of mostly European descent but has becoming a term more commonly used for describing people of mixed

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    The creoles are a big part of who we are today. The colonial term ‘'Creole'' means a person of mixed European and black descent. They started things like language, food, religion, and music that we still use, cook, and listen to today. Creole culture is a mix of French, African, and Native American customs. ‘'Creoles are a self-identified group of various people of French, Spanish, and Portuguese descendants who live in the coastal area of Louisiana mainly New Orleans.'' (galegroup.com ‘'Creoles'')

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    recently, there are some creole dictionaries and Haitian Creole is being taught in schools. People tend to have a negative perception of a creole and thus, the people who speak and chose to write in this creole language are often lumped into a box. There is a stigma attached to it, and people often say that it is the language of the poor lower class of the country. Growing up in St. Lucia, I saw how this is true, people are often embarrassed by their parent who spoke creole, or they as children where

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    many cultures in the world but only specific ones are within a society. Here in Belize there are many but the one that will be elaborated is the creole culture. Lela Vernon was a Belizean who was a Kriol and promoted it in everything she did. For instance, she talked, lived and song using the Kriol culture. She contributed a lot of things to the creole culture here in Belize. Lela Vernon expresses components of Belizean culture by showing them while singing. For instance, the words she uses in

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    Literature Review The term Creole can be described as a language which comes into being through contact between two or more languages. In relating to Jamaica, the creole language came about by the Africans slaves were forced into accepting Standard English which they the reduced in order to obtain a common language, Creole for communication, a point expounded on by Ruby Madden The importance of the use of Creole in the Jamaican society is a topic that is highly debatable, and relates and is affected

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    Poetry within Jamaican Creole in a Linguistic Imperalised England It is clear from the poem to see how Linton feels about the racially hostile environment in which he lives. He chooses to show his social identity with his strong Jamaican accent which conveys to the reader that he is of immigrant status, this is fundamental to this poem. Within this essay, I wish to analyze his reasoning for choosing to express himself with a post colonial approach by using his Jamaican Creole and how he chooses

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    Hawaii creole english, or in other words “pidgin,” is based on the english language, but also containing words from many other languages. Some of those languages include Hawaiian, Japanese, Portuguese, and more. Hawaii pidgin english is widely used in everyday conversations, television shows, and advertisements. Hawaii creole english was created many years ago, but is used by a large number of people on the Hawaiian islands, as well as on the mainland. Hawai’i creole english was first established

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    Reading an Academic Source: “Historic low prestige and seeds of change: Attitudes toward Jamaican Creole” Jamaican Creole (known to its speakers as Patois) is a language of ethnic identification for roughly two and a half million people in the island of Jamaica, and overseas for many thousands of native speakers. The origins of the Jamaican Creole postdate 1660, in the interaction of British colonists and African slaves. Jamaican language and its place in society reflects the brutal history

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