Croats

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  • The Conflict Between Dinamo Zagreb And Red Star

    2054 Words  | 9 Pages

    Yugoslavia in the 20th century underwent great political turmoil, unrest, war, and ethnic conflicts. Throughout the existence of this unstable nation, soccer was the most popular sport with the most devout supporters. The sport and its various teams held strong ties to the political structure of Yugoslavia, being run and controlled often by government institutions. It is for this reason that soccer in Yugoslavia can serve as a political barometer to understand the underlying concerns, ideologies

  • The Yugoslavian Conflict Essay

    1285 Words  | 6 Pages

    The Yugoslavian Conflict Yugoslavia is a country burdened by feuding sides in a war that cannot soon be resolved. The United Nations are attempting to help the situation, but until the people of Yugoslavia can come to an agreement continued warfare and heartache is inevitable. The problems in Yugoslavia began because the country is separated into two distinct parts. The north and west parts of the country were once under the rule of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and the south and the east were

  • Essay on The Yugoslavian Conflict

    1290 Words  | 6 Pages

    The Yugoslavian Conflict Yugoslavia is a country burdened by feuding sides in a war that cannot soon be resolved. The United Nations are attempting to help the situation, but until the people of Yugoslavia can come to an agreement continued warfare and heartache is inevitable. The problems in Yugoslavia began because the country is separated into two distinct parts. The north and west parts of the country were once under the rule of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and the south and the

  • The Bridge Betrayed And The Buddhas Of Bamiyan

    1239 Words  | 5 Pages

    The authors of The Bridge Betrayed and The Buddhas of Bamiyan both identify a different form of cultural eradication that occurred in within the past twenty-five years. In Bosnia-Herzegovina, the Serbs and Croats wanted to destroy the Bosnian Muslim symbols, culture, and population. In Afghanistan, the Taliban destroyed the Buddhas of Bamiyan, and in turn, changed the identity of Bamiyan forever. The practice of cultural eradication is not limited to these two cases. Cultural eradication has taken

  • Community Analysis Essay

    1629 Words  | 7 Pages

    history. Conversions of fictions into history and history into perceived fiction powers patriotism, and on the extreme end nationalism. Ignatieff states nationalism's propaganda on Serb radio about the Croats sets the stone for the ignorance they need in order to separate themselves from the Croats, and to perceive their differences as threats to their over-embraced uniqueness. “Nationalism is a fiction: it requires the willing suspension of disbelief. To believe in nationalist fictions is to forget

  • Bosnian Rwandan Genocide Comparison Essay

    834 Words  | 4 Pages

    both were started due to past hatreds between the two conflicting factions. The Rwandan Genocide was ignited due to hatred of Tutsi by the Hutu when the former were still in power. The Bosnian Genocide due to long-lasting hatred between the Serbs and Croats. When Rwanda was first colonized Tutsi were considered to be above the Hutu, but the balance of power was shifted between the two groups when Belgium abandoned the state due to revolution. When the Tutsi were in power, the Hutu were always treated

  • The Yugoslav Wars: The Greatest Conflicts Since World War II Essay

    3160 Words  | 13 Pages

    republics: Bosnia & Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia and Slovenia. Additionally, two autonomous provinces, Vojvodina and Kosovo, were established in Serbia. Many different ethnic groups called Yugoslavia home, namely the Serbs, Croats, Slovenes, Bosniaks, Albanians, and Montenegrins. However, the presence of large ethnic minorities across republic lines made things complicated, especially with the advent of rising nationalism among these different peoples. The borders of the

  • Peace in Yugoslavia From 1919 Until 1980 Essay

    3549 Words  | 15 Pages

    The Croats were Roman Catholic, people living in Bosnia were mainly Muslim, as were people living in Kosovo. Serbia was a separate independent country, ruled by its own King. The Serb religion was Christian Orthodox. The Treaty

  • The Tragedy Of The Bosnian Genocide

    1412 Words  | 6 Pages

    land area, and inspired strong nationalist feelings in Serbs. In 1992, Bosnia declared its independence as well. Bosnia was composed of several ethnicities, including the Bosnian Muslims (Bosniaks), who were the majority, Bosnian Serbs, and Bosnian Croats. Savo Heleta, who was living in Bosnia at the time, described the ethnic boundaries in her book, Not My Turn To Die: “...there were no clear-cut boundaries- there weren’t three different regions, one for each ethnic group. People lived in ethnically

  • Yugoslavia Essay

    2633 Words  | 11 Pages

    Europe, Yugoslavia was created after World War I as a homeland for several different rival ethnic groups. The country was put together mostly from remnants of the collapsed Ottoman Empire and Austria-Hungary. Demands for self-determination by Slovenes, Croats, Serbs, and others were ignored. Yugoslavia thus became an uneasy association of peoples conditioned by centuries of ethnic and religious hatreds. World War II aggravated these rivalries, but Communist dictatorship after the war controlled them for

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