Deaf Children Essay

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    Deaf Children

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    Deaf children born to deaf parents have the advantage of being exposed to gestural language from birth. American Sign Language (ASL) is the system used by the Deaf community in the United States and Canada. Although, Deaf children with Deaf parents are not receiving sensory input for spoken language, they are exposed to a language that will enable them to fully communicate meaning. Through the use of ASL, Deaf children have the ability to learn a language without the need for oral communication.

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    Parenting Deaf Children

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    expect to hear from their doctor that just helped give birth to their newborn baby. Months pass by and the watch as their child grows from an infant to a toddler. When they go to the pediatrician for a routine check-up, they find out that their child is deaf. Approximately 3 in 1,000 babies are born with permanent hearing loss, making hearing loss one of the most common birth defects in America. (ASHA). Parents usually suspect a hearing loss before

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    Deaf and Muted In every facet of life, language plays a critical role. Virginia Frazier-Maiwald describes the significance of language saying, Language is the glue that allows us to establish and maintain our relationships. It is the way in which we transmit our most intimate thoughts and feelings. It is what we use to love and discipline our children. Without a common language, our thoughts, feelings, and opinions are misinterpreted or lost. A place without

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    loss. The term Deaf is considered to be a disability solely on the fact that an individual who is Deaf is not “normal” due to their hearing loss. Most individuals do not believe that there are any benefits or positives from being Deaf, nor do they believe that a Deaf individual will ever be able to live a happy and fulfilled life. Deaf individuals do not view themselves as disabled nor do they view their lives as a loss, rather they view their Deafness as a Gain. This is called Deaf Gain, meaning

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    Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, about two to three children out of every 1,000 are born with a detectable level of hearing impairment in the United States. Without hearing, children miss out on the acoustic correlates of the physical world, such as car horns and footsteps. Children are also limited in their exposure to patterned complexities in music and spoken word. These hard of hearing and deaf students grow and develop in unique ways compared to their hearing peers because

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    American Society for Deaf Children (ASDC). This organization gives information to people who must make decisions about their deaf children. The reason I chose this organization is because they favor the use of sign language with all children, regardless of their hearing status. ASDC was founded in 1967 as a parent-helping-parent organization originally called The International Association of Parents of Deaf Children. In 1985, they changed their name to American Society for Deaf Children. ASDC is a non-profit

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    hearing family or-or hard of hearing have to make sure that their deaf child who is between 3 to five years should know minimum the basics of the sign language before doing the cochlear implants surgery. A first reason why it is important that the family should to do the cochlear implants to their deaf child after he/she learns to use the sign language is that sign language will give the family a chance to understand and accept the Deaf community. According to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association(ASHA)

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    is our ability to use language to communicate with the world around us. The capability to produce novel and complex sentences is a skill that every child learns if the conditions allow him or her to do so. What is most amazing about this is that children gain this capability in such a short amount of time. Within 5 years of life humans use the linguistic input of the world around them to produce novel ideas and thoughts. Regardless of where or how one lives, the process of acquiring language is often

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    Chapter 2 delves into the lives of families with deaf children. It also goes into the genealogy of the Deaf community. It is a common factor that Deaf parents would prefer having a Deaf child, simply because having a hearing child would be more complicated for them. This does not mean that they would love their hearing children any less, The birth of a Deaf baby secures that the legacy of more Deaf children is possible. They are more than happy to celebrate when this kind of news is brought their

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    Reflections on Volunteering at a Camp for Deaf Children It was the first night of camp, and the kids were lining up for dinner. Most were still showing signs of adjusting: the older, seasoned campers were renewing friendships and checking out possible new ones, the girls carrying on animated conversations while their eyes strayed ever so slightly, sweeping the area like radar, acknowledging the presence of a teenaged boy with a blip in the eyes; the younger campers were more reserved, fighting

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