Dodger Stadium

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    me was “Dodgers asking $12 million a year for naming rights to field”, by Terry Lefton. In the eyes of some, commercialism has saturated historical Major League Baseball stadiums with signage and advertisements plastered across walls. Today, America’s third-oldest MLB venue is looking to challenge the MLB’s legacy as the most traditional sport by selling the naming rights to the field in Chavez Ravine, which has been home to the Los Angeles Dodgers since 1962. In this manner, the stadium would be

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    valley of Chavez Ravine lies Dodger Stadium. Overlooking green valleys and rolling hills with the skyscrapers of the city behind it, Dodger Stadium appears as the epitome of peace in bustling Los Angeles. Few would fathom that beneath this sanctum of the Los Angeles Dodgers resides a village of Mexican Americans. Critics ranging from muralist Judy Baca, to academic writers Tara Yosso and David García, to the people displaced themselves argue that the creation of Dodger Stadium can never be justified because

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    situation occurred with the beloved Dodgers Stadium. Home to many Champions, and Hall of Famers, Dodgers Stadium has become one of the best known baseball parks in the nation due to it being the 3rd oldest in the nation. It is home to the MLB team Los Angeles Dodgers who once were the Brooklyn Dodgers. The Dodgers Stadium, would’ve not been anything if it was not for the many homes that were lost in the 1950s in what is now called the Chavez Ravine. Dodgers stadium has become a historical landmark

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    Chavez Ravine

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    Years ago, there was once a small town called Chaves Ravine within Los Angeles, California and this town was a poor rural community that was always full of life. Two hundred families, mostly Chicano families, were living here quite peacefully until the Housing Act of 1949 was passed. The Federal Housing Act of 1949 granted money to cities from the federal government to build public housing projects for the low income. Los Angeles was one of the first cities to receive the funds for project. Unfortunately

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    given to them to relocate in order to build federally funded public houses. The Chavez Ravine faced many problems from the remove of its inhabitants to subject of McCarthyism, and finally an unhappy memory to those who lost their homes when the Dodger Stadium was built. The Chavez Ravine

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    Chavez Ravine formally known as Dodger Town “The Red Scare of the 1950s, the years of Senator MCcarthy the city began condemning homes” (Normark 17.) When many social and interracial labor movements of the Left were dismantled. This was not an isolated case this was happening all over the country right before our own eyes. A 1950 far-sighted housing development of 3364 housing units proposed on a 278-acre site in the underprivileged downtown Chavez Ravine neighborhood. Elysian Park Heights, the project

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    Do you have a railyard hosts near your school? Have you ever breath in the toxic fumes of the factories which next to your home? Barrio Logan is an old community which located near the jungle of I-5 freeway, a Navy base and three large shipyards, it is also the homeland of more than 50,876 of low-income minority and the most industrialized areas in the San Diego. People name it as the “California’s toxic hot spots” since the area has been struggled with the unhealthy mixed land use of industries

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    Essay on Hines’ Article Triggers Response

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    A journal article’s goal is to inform the reader of a subject, but it also attempts to conjure a response or thought of any kind. “Housing, Baseball, and Creeping Socialism The Battle of Chavez Ravine, Los Angeles, 1949-1959” by Thomas S. Hines causes a reaction from the start by failing to include an abstract to aid the reader. Had I not had a background in Chavez Ravine, this would be a crucial negligence. Once the essay begins, Hines delves straight into Chavez Ravine, the architects behind the

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              ~ Daniel Sutter, “Public Subsidies for Sports Stadiums Don’t           Spur Economic Growth”           Some urban (stadium) facilities….Built in blighted areas,                have had positive spin-off effects

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    years dozens of new sports stadiums have been built throughout the country, with major funding coming from public subsidies. The aim of this paper is to analyze the positive and negative impacts that come with these subsidies. The issue at hand, however, is that power has shifted from the cities to the teams themselves. Professional athletic organizations have started taking advantage of cities by threatening to relocate unless they get public subsidies for expensive stadium renovations and construction

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