Milgram experiment

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    Among the top most famous and shocking psychology experiments are the Milgram Obedience Experiment, The Asch Conformity Experiment and The Standfort Prison Experiment of Zimbardo. Those experiments helped us change the waye think about the human mind and behavior. The Milgram Obedience Experiment Near the 1960 Yale University psychologist Stanley Miligram began what would become one of social psychology’s most famous experiments. Milgram began his work during the widely publicized trial of the

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    Huennerkopf Mrs. Gumina English III 3 March 2015 Milgram Experiment What would you do if your boss asked you to do something that inflicts pain on another human? Would you still do it? Keep in mind, if you did not comply you would be fired. This concept was studied by Stanley Milgram, a psychologist at Yale University. He composed an experiment focusing on the conflict between obedience to authority and personal conscience. Stanley Milgram conducted this experiment because of his curiosity with World War

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    The Milgram Experiment

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    The Milgram experiment was performed by the sociologist Stanley Milgram to discover the power of authority. In this experiment, Stanley was trying to demonstrate the willingness people have to follow orders from an authority figure. Even thought the results of this experiment were very surprising, I think that this kind of experiments would allows us to study and understand better the human’s nature. This experiment showed a side of human’s nature that was unknown by the scientistic community, and

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    Milgram Experiment

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    they both use example to prove this argument; one example would be the Milgram experiment; which involved a subject who would get shocked every time they got the answer wrong and the voltage of the shock would increase as the experiment progressed, and the teacher

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    The Milgram Experiment

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    The Milgram Experiment conducted at Yale University in 1963, focused on whether a person would follow instructions from someone showing authority. Students (actors) were asked questions by the teachers (participants), if the students got the answer wrong they would receive a shock each higher than the previous. The shocks ranged from Slight shock (15v) to Danger! (300v) to XXX (450v). Stanley Milgram wanted to know if people would do things just because someone with authority told them to, even if

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    The Milgram Experiment

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    The Milgram experiment was an experiment in which subjects volunteered to shock another “volunteer”. The subjects, also known as “teachers”, were escorted into a lab where they were introduced to another “volunteer”, alluded to as the “learner”. At this time the teachers also met the researcher. After meeting the experimenter and the learner, the volunteers were encouraged to shock the “learner” if he or she did not correctly restate the words. As the learner failed to correctly restate the words

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    The Milgram Experiments

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    1. The Milgram experiments tests males from varying ages, and education levels, to see how far the will follow orders at other person’s expense. The test was well prepared, and had a base line for responses, that would give accurate data. The “teacher” in the experiment would issue shocks to the “learner” for each wrong response, with increasing voltage each time. The study found that 50% of the 40 males completed the test; issuing a shock of 450 volts 3 times, in the end of the test. Although, most

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    The Milgram Experiment

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    The Milgram experiment was a very famous study on obedience. The research was on everyday people and their compliance towards authority figures orders to inflict pain on others. Participants were instructed to give “fake” electric shocks to students, who are actually actors, learning memory tasks. They were instructed to give out electric shocks to the learners each time they gave a wrong response and would also move a level higher on the shock initiator each additional time an answer was incorrect

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    psychologist by the name of Stanley Milgram created an experiment to figure out how obedient a person really was to their authority figure. According to Kristen Fescoe, a publisher of the Online Psychology Degree Guide, the Milgram experiment is one of the 25 most influential psychological experiments in history because of its enduring impact in the psychological community. This essay reveals what the experiment was for and how it affected the world. In 1961 Stanley Milgram put an ad in the newspapers and

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    Stanley Milgram conducted an experiment to find out how far people would go in obeying instructions if it included harming another person. This experiment was also trying to prove how easily an ordinary person could be influenced into committing atrocities such as the Nazi killings in World War II (McLeod, 2007). The experiment was first advertised in the newspaper to look for male participants for the experiment and they were paid $4.50 for participating the experiment which were conducted at

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