Musical film

Page 1 of 50 - About 500 essays
  • The Musical Theatre And Film

    1607 Words  | 7 Pages

    affected the creation of this art form?) Musical Theatre is a form of theater combing music, songs, and spoken dialog, which can be traced back to the theatre of ancient Greece. The music and dance were included in stage comedies and tragedies during the 5th century BCE. However, the music is disappeared in these eras for a long time, so that they had no real influence on the development of modern musical theatre and film. There is no serious effect of a musical theatre over the society and political

  • The North American Musical Film

    1330 Words  | 6 Pages

    The North American Musical Film The musical film in the United States is largely associated with Broadway theatre. Broadway is an area in New York City where the biggest theatres are located, accommodating at least 500 people. Smaller theatres are said to be located Off-Broadway and even smaller theatres are called Off-Off-Broadway. Some notable musical films such as Chicago (2002), My Fair Lady (1964) and West Side Story (1961) were adapted from musical plays and trace their origins to Broadway

  • The Cyclical Teen Musical Film

    2030 Words  | 9 Pages

    The Cyclical Teen Musical Film Considered by Jane Feuer to be “the only form of musical that retains widespread popularity” (123), the teen musical film is a cyclical sub-genre of the musical film that keeps coming back again and again since the 1960s, proving that it is a sub-genre here to stay. And since this is a cyclical sub-genre, its historical development is also cyclical in matter: it develops slightly throughout the cycle, as per many other film genres, but always seems to return back to

  • Difference Between Musical Theatre And Film Musicals

    1873 Words  | 8 Pages

    A musical film is a genre of movie where songs sung by characters are added into the storyline, occasionally complemented by choreography. The musical numbers in these films do not always develop the plot and characters, but they do give the films a more exciting quality. The primary difference between musical theatre and film musicals is the use of extravagant scenery that would be extraordinarily unreasonable for a stage performance. While making movies, the individuals involved have the luxury

  • Analysis Of The Film ' A Backstage Musical '

    1213 Words  | 5 Pages

    Part One 1. Absolute films: “A particular type of Non Narrative avant-garde films are the Absolute films, which are completely abstract films”, the films that is nonrepresentational, using form and design to produce its effect and often describable as visual music. 2. Sequence shot: Sequence shot is basically amounting to one long shot that extends for an entire scene or sequence. It is just one shot with what the camera can gather, without any later editing. And so, it allows time and

  • Analysis Of The Film ' Backstage Musical '

    1225 Words  | 5 Pages

    Loc Truong Professor: Dr. Avy Valladares Part One 1. Absolute films: “A particular type of Non Narrative avant-garde films are the Absolute films, which are completely abstract films”, the films that is nonrepresentational, using form and design to produce its effect and often describable as visual music. 2. Sequence shot: Sequence shot is basically amounting to one long shot that extends for an entire scene or sequence. It is just one shot with what the camera can gather, without any later editing

  • High School Musical : The Film Review : High School Musical

    1196 Words  | 5 Pages

    I remember when I first watched High School Musical the movie. I knew all the words and choreography to every song and dance they showed during the movie. As a kid, I was excited to go to high school because of the movies I’ve seen about it, high school musical in particular; and they made it look awesome. However, when I got to high school it was nothing like the movies. High School Musical with a plot similar to a modern Romeo and Juliet, is a teen comedy starring two students from opposite social

  • The Musical Essay

    1823 Words  | 8 Pages

    The Musical The classical period of the musical coincided with the heyday of the Hollywood studios from the early thirties to the early fifties. The conventions of the integrated musical were formed in the Astaire--Rogers musicals made at RKO in the thirties and the form peaked at MGM in the forties and early fifties, most notably in films produced by Arthur Freed. Thomas Schatz has provided a useful definition of the integrated musical. `Rather than create a realistic --or at

  • Film Analysis Of Singing In The Rain

    1326 Words  | 6 Pages

    Singin’ in the Rain was originally released in 1952, until it concealed by another prestigious film called, “An American in Paris”. Singin’ in the Rain has gradually grown in popularity and appeal. The case of Singing in the Rain demonstrates how the popular film, which has endured in value over the years to achieve canonical status as a classic, changes in its meaning. I feel it is important to define the word “classic” as it will be used here. Classic is a term that is “thrown around” and generally

  • Comparison Of Minnelli And Jacques Demy's Les Demoiselles De Rochebury

    750 Words  | 3 Pages

    with his musicals, carefully designed every little detail. For him, the mise-en-scene was paramount, so much so that character development would be expressed through the scenery. For example, Gene Kelly literally brings color wherever he goes in American in Paris. In Minnelli’s world, the worst thing a character can do is bring ugliness. Beauty was key. But that’s not to say that Minnelli’s films were light and fluffy. Even his airier films, like The Pirate, had tonal complexity. Demy’s musical world

Previous
Page12345678950