Opium den

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  • Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray Essay examples

    1731 Words  | 7 Pages

    Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray      The Picture of Dorian Gray is a novel by Oscar Wilde. The genre of this novel can be classified as a comedy of manners or a gothic novel. The Picture of Dorian Gray was first published in 1890 in Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine. Another version with an additional six chapters was published in 1891. One of the major themes in the novel was the Supremacy of Beauty and Youth. A very attractive man has a portrait painted of himself, and after being warned

  • Hypocrisy In Oscar Wilde's The Picture Of Dorian Gray

    987 Words  | 4 Pages

    and opium was as popular as alcohol. Laudanum, a mixture of herbs, wine, and 10% opium, was sold freely by chemists and used in treatment of headaches, asthma, menstrual cramps, and even as a soporific to quiet crying children. But for those who had a stronger taste for the drug, opium dens along London’s sea ports offered a discreet haven for aristocratic addicts who did not want to be seen buying opium in town. Dorian Gray himself has an affliction for opium, and seeks comfort in an opium den after

  • Moralism In Dorian Gray

    776 Words  | 4 Pages

    A Deal With the Devil The idea of selling your soul comes from the German story, Faust. In the legend, moral integrity is taken in exchange for an object of desire. Dr. Faustus sells his soul for twenty-four years of good luck, however, is haunted by his fear of hell. Similar to the legend, Dorian Gray sells his soul for eternal beauty. His desire to repent and rid of the painting, from which his soul is trapped in, until he is consumed by the temptation. The painting decays to the point of no return

  • What Is The Theme Of The Picture Of Dorian Gray

    723 Words  | 3 Pages

    portrait was mainly caused by his feelings of guilt. Throughout the book, specifically in the last chapters, Dorian is continuously regretting his actions and searching for forgiveness. A perfect example is the moment, in which, Dorian goes to the opium den with the goal of forgetting everything after noticing that forgiveness is not an option and it is impossible. The narrator tells that: “He was prisoned in thought. Memory, like a horrible malady, was eating his soul away. From time to time he seemed

  • Social Codes In Oscar Wilde's The Picture Of Dorian Gray

    1085 Words  | 5 Pages

    Victorians, and opium was as popular as alcohol. Laudanum, a mixture of herbs, wine, and 10% opium, was sold freely by chemists and used in the treatment of headaches, asthma, menstrual cramps, and even as a soporific to quiet crying children. But for those who had a stronger taste for the drug, opium dens along London’s Eastern seaports offered a discreet haven for aristocratic addicts who did not want to be seen buying opium in town. Dorian Gray himself has an affection for opium, and seeks comfort

  • Beauty And Hedonism In The Picture Of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde

    838 Words  | 4 Pages

    The novel “The Picture of Dorian Gray” by Oscar Wilde first published in 1890 deals with Dorian Gray a young beautiful man who sits for a full-length portrait, drawn by the artist Basil Hallward. Basil is fascinated by Dorians beauty and sees him as his muse and the reason his art got a new expression. Sitting for the portrait Dorian meets Lord Henry Wotton, a friend of Basil with a quite hedonistic philosophy. Lord Henry is known to influence people a lot and sees Dorian as the perfect ideal to

  • The Picture of Dorian Gray Essay example

    2310 Words  | 10 Pages

    “There were passions in him that would find their terrible outlet, dreams that would make the shadow of the real evil” (Wilde,115). The author reveals pleasure as the driving force of many characters within Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray, but this search for pleasure becomes fatal once taken into the hands of Dorian Gray. Throughout the novel Dorian Gray changes his opinion on pleasure based on what he requires in order to escape reality. With each death and misdeed he is responsible for;

  • Relationships In Dorian Gray

    861 Words  | 4 Pages

    Oscar Wilde was born in year of 1854 in Dublin, Ireland. Oscar Wilde’s parents were not an aristocrats but they were well-off and provide him with a proper educations. He was educated at Trinity College in Dublin and at Magdalen College, Oxford, and settled in London was where his married his wife, Constance Lyold in 1884 and had 2 sons. Wilde fell in with an artistic crowd that included great irish poet and began mediocre poetry but soon he achieved widespread fame for his comic plays. “The Picture

  • Inner and Outer Beauty in Dorian Gray

    1512 Words  | 7 Pages

    The term ‘beauty' may have very relative significance. Something can be beautiful for us, but ugly for other people. The external beauty of a person is often the first thing that we pay attention to. This is the result of the association of beauty with good and ugliness with evil. Through the outer appearance we make a general opinion about a given person. Such a way of thinking may be very misleading. In order to get to know the person we need to look to the inside – into the soul. This is the place

  • Relationships And Literary Devices In Narcopolis By Jeet Thayil

    1214 Words  | 5 Pages

    might be considered to be close to his own biopic, a fact that Thayil does not try to conceal. It is an enchanting tale of Mumbai's hazy world of opium addiction in the 1970s when the underbelly of Bombay was disjointed from the glitz and glamour of the new found city. The book

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