Prisoners Of War Essay

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    When at war their will be casualties, their are gonna be deaths and people from both sides will be taken prisoner and shoved into prison camps. The term Prisoner Of War refers to someone who has been captured by their force they are opposing. Prisoners of war have been a concept since medieval times where one nation would take another nation's soldiers as captives but due to the harsh fighting normally there wouldn't be many survivors after the initial conflict to be taken prisoner but if you were

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    “Captivity in war is a different and confronting experience, regardless of the particular conflict” Dr. Rosalind Hearder The many Australian soldiers that were captured and put in one of the prisoners of war camps were help against there own free will. They were forced to go through with doing things that were not acceptable. World War 2 began during September in 1939, it started when the Germans attacked Poland, Britain and France announced war toward Germany after Hitler refused to abandon the

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    A Prisoner of War is someone who has been caught by taken as a prisoner by the opposing team in the war in this case it was the Australians, Chinese, Papua New Guinea, Malaysia, Singapore and many more were captured and taken into the Japanese camps. The conditions of these camps were nothing like anyone ever imagined. They were surrounded with barbed wire, or a high wooden fence. Anyone who ever attempted to escape these camps would end up being executed in front of the other prisoners. The conditions

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    “Hello mother, father, this is your Louie talking. This will be the first time in two years that you’ve heard my voice. I am now interned at a Tokyo prisoner of war camp and I’m being treated as well as can be expected under wartime conditions.” As a viewer we can see the look of pure disgust and longing upon Louie’s face. It was evident that he wasn’t eager to read what was prepared for him as it depicted a false perception of what his wartime conditions were truly like. The fact that he had to

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    A young couple overcome hardship when the husband goes missing in war and a lighter and a ring keep the families connected, giving them hope. BRIEF SYNOPSIS EDWARD “Ed” HEWITT feels an emotional connection to his Uncle Earl’s silver lighter. It’s a lighter that the family treasures and reminds them of Earl, who died. When Ed’s father, LLOYD, comes upon a car accident, he helps save two women, EMILY NOVAL (20’s) and her mother, MARY. Lloyd is surprised when he sees Mary. He recognizes the ring

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    The Prisoner Of War Camps

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    States immediately after the Civil War knew very little of the atrocities of that occurred in the prisoner of war camps. News that their family member was in a prisoner of war camp was usually dreaded by the family of the captured soldiers. While being dead was much worse the families never truly knew what was going on inside the camps. For the Confederacy, many feared Rock Island, but there was a just as deadly camp just north of Rock Island in Chicago. Once the war had ended the atrocities of what

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    Controversies of prisoners of war The book “Unbroken” was a seemingly impossible tale of triumph and survival of an Olympic runner and WWII veteran named Louis Zamperini. He constantly had to overcome adversity in his early years, for he was an immigrant from Italy and a trouble maker before his brother Pete steered him into running track. This immediately turned him around as he did well enough to in running to break all sorts if local records, which were accomplished while his competitors were

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    states who have signed this treaty are obliged to treat prisoners of war. How this treaty is enforced and the effectiveness of the enforcement as well as how this treaty has been upheld and looked at over the decades that it has been in effect will be analyzed. Failings by some countries in upholding the principles of this treaty will be discussed as well. The third Geneva Convention very specifically lists how you must treat Prisoners of War. This convention first broadened who actually were POWs

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    Prisoners of War

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    No one goes to war thinking they will be the one captured and tortured by the enemy. As Canadian troops sailed to Europe to join in the fighting of World War Two, they more likely had nightmares about dying tragically, or suffering for days. No one really worried about being captured because war was associated with fighting, guns, winning and losing. A rude awakening came to those captured and taken to the many different concentration camps. Canadian POW's endured very unfortunate experiences in

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    Prisoners Of War

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    honour the Geneva Convention.’ SMH, February 6, 1945 Discuss the experiences of Australian Prisoners of War (POWs) at the hands of the Japanese with particular focus on the camps and the notorious death marches. Examine why a number of Japanese soldiers paid little attention to the Geneva Convention. This essay is intend to outline the perspective of the soldiers who were held by the Japanese army as prisoners of war (POW), it is also intend to discuss the obligations of the Geneva Conventions and how

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