Scientific Discovery Essay

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    try and get a message or an idea across. For some topics its easier than others, but when you’re trying and prove the whole idea of discovery wrong it may be more difficult. Thomas Kuhn writes Historical Structure of Scientific Discovery in an attempt to try and convey his message that the timeline role of discovery is wrong. He denies the idea about how some discoveries are misleading and make it seem they were found in a single moment. When you write you must assume that anyone can read it, so you

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    Scientific Revolution The Scientific Revolution refers to a time in history when developments in the sciences took off and changed the view of society regarding the earth and nature. Some of the relevant topics of this time were mathematics, astronomy, biology, physics and chemistry. Typically, the scientific revolution is considered the time in Europe starting around the end of the Renaissance period and lasting through the late 18th century. Between 1543 and 1700, Europe underwent many changes

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    know as the “Scientific Method” conducting experiments and trying to discover new things. This is done using a five-step process that starts with identifying the problem or desired goal. The next step is to propose a hypothesis followed by making a prediction. The forth step is to test the prediction and the fifth and final step, is to draw a conclusion. and (Postlethwait, J., Hopson, J., 2011). During the fourth step, test the prediction, is the step that most accidental discoveries occur because

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    As a professor of Logic and the Scientific Method at the University of London, Karl Popper translated his own original version of The Logic of Scientific Discovery, which was originally called Logik der Forschung, to English (Stuermann). One statement that he makes, even before the actual text begins, is how hard answering questions and ideas in philosophy are is compared to other fields, such as the physical sciences. Compared to a physicist, for example, that is trying to prove a point by solving

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    Before the Scientific Revolution began to take shape around the year 1550, the world of science was exceedingly narrow and thought to be known. The scientific views of the pre-scientific revolution stem back even further than the popular Aristotelian era of science. Hippocrates contributed greatly to the field of science, especially in the field of medicine. It was during his years of medical studies that Hippocrates theorized the “Four Temperaments”. This theory hypothesized that there are four

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    In the last century, scientific process has become dominant, praised and one of the most widely accepted ways to gather and test information about our surroundings. In response to such acknowledgment, science benefited the humankind with many important discoveries that changed our perception of life and even shaped our understanding of the origins of species. Although groundbreaking, these discoveries have shown us that scientific progress is more of a long-term investment into human knowledge

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    During the period of enlightenment and scientific discovery of the 17th century, differing concepts of the scientific method emerged. Amongst these, René Descartes and Sir Isaac Newton had some of the more prominent ideologies. Through The Discourse On Method Descartes describes his rules for “discovering the truth”(Sherman. P.74) based on his mathematical background. Many of these are based on logical deductions and examining individual sections of a hypothesis to determine their truths. A few decades

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    was the most influential figure of the scientific revolution. The scientific revolution brought attention to many figures, Copernicus and Galileo, but Newton is the scientist with most influential changes that that have changed how we think. His research and discovery of gravitation formula led to the scientific method. While that was his most famous discovery, he also had many findings in the mathematical field. Newton changed the way we think and his discovery on gravity was monumental, but even today

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    I watched and recommend “How simple ideas lead to scientific discoveries” by Adam Savage. Adam Savage cites two examples of how great scientific discoveries came about because of the simple thoughts from now famous researchers. A letter from a man curious as to how he was able to see his reflection perfectly in the water at the bottom of a well led Eratosthenes to think of another location where the angle of the Sun was noticeably different. Using geometry he was able to come up with an accurate

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    Antibiotics Antibiotics transformed medicine. The discovery of antibiotics began by accident. On the morning of September 3rd, 1928, Professor Alexander Fleming was having a clear up of his cluttered laboratory. Fleming was sorting through a number of glass plates which had previously been coated with staphyloccus bacteria as part of research Fleming was doing. One of the plates had mould on it. The mould was in the shape of a ring and the area around the ring seemed to be free of the bacteria staphyloccus

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    of knowledge and scientific discovery through the main characters; Victor Frankenstein, the Creature and Robert Walton. This pursuit of knowledge drives the plot of the novel, leading Victor to create the Creature in his attempt to break down the mortal barriers that surround him and unlock the secret of life. Robert Walton’s quest for discovery leads him to the North Pole, far beyond the reach of Humans at that time. Ultimately Victor’s thirst for knowledge and scientific discovery did him more harm

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    Neanderthals, mankind’s assumed ancestral brute for the ages, were the pinnacle of scientific discovery since many of their redeeming qualities were highly underestimated. Originally classified in the species Homo as Homo neandethalensis after the first specimen was found in the Neanderthal Valley in Germany. Neanderthals roamed the lands of Western Europe from 250,000 years ago to about the time H. sapiens came of the scene in 39,000 years ago. When the word Neanderthal first comes to mind, it 's

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    1950s there wasn't many discoveries, but the little discoveries there was had a big impact in the world of science. Discoveries such as the double helix were important because they helped expand the knowledge of science in more ways than just one. In 1953 Watson and Crick discovered DNA structured that was named the double helix. It wasn't a big hit at first but after the paper published in December 19, the discovery managed to beat even the climb of Mt. Everest. Another discovery during the year 1950

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    Making a scientific discovery is very rare, but what this student that goes to the University of Brookside made a historical discovery that can go either good or bad for the people of the earth. Over the month of November, Ayesha Patel was secretly working on a medicine that will keep animals from going extinct. She was experimenting with a few human medicines that might work for animals. Her goal was to make a medicine that would keep all animals from being dead. She mixed Advil ( medicine for

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    DNA discovery is the most important scientific discovery of 20th century which increased our knowledge about hereditary material as the basis of life. It is present in all organisms from microscopic organisms like bacterium to macroscopic organisms like whale. It not only determines the physical characteristics of the organisms but the diseases develop in them. Deoxyribo nucleic acid is discovered by the decades of efforts made by the scientists. The history of the discovery of structure of DNA

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    Human manipulation occurs for a large number of reasons, including; increasing profit/productivity in agriculture and farming, creating medical aids for human diseases, increasing survival chances of the given species and opening pathways for scientific discovery. Two major methods humans manipulation can be noted; selective breeding, which is the breeding of organisms within the same species to increase the frequency of existing genes, and transgenesis, the transfer of genes into the genome of one

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    Topic #4: Mathematical and Scientific Discoveries of India, China, and Greece There are many ancient civilizations that had achievements in math and science. Three of these civilizations were India, China, and Greece. Ancient India was founded in about 2500 B.C., and its first civilization was known as the Indus River Valley Civilization. It was located near the Indus and Ganges Rivers, which periodically overflowed. Along with its mathematical and scientific achievements, it was one of the first

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    I will attempt to clearly explain an argument offered by René Descartes in Rules for the Discovery of Scientific Truth. In order to accomplish this task, I will discern and explain Descartes’ argument, offer what I consider to be the most significant objection to the argument, and contemplate how Descartes would reply to my objection. For the purposes of explanation, I will temporarily put aside the first sentence of the paragraph in which Descartes’ argument can be found. The second sentence of

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    Jurassic Park is a science fiction novel written by Michael Crichton which was published in 1990. The book follows a mysterious island that is inhabited by genetically engineered dinosaurs created by a bioengineering firm. The story lets us watch as visitors land on the island at the request of the rich billionaire who owns the island and the bioengineering firm, which is named InGen to revel in the wonder that they have created. We follow all the miss-steps until all is lost and the island has to

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    doctor was able to make himself into another person with the use of scientific experiment. It is clear that Stevenson is trying to show how there is both good and evil in a person and how this can be a desperate internal struggle. This attitude of human nature may also play a role in the author’s view of developing science and technology. Perhaps Stevenson is trying to demonstrate the duel repercussions that scientific discovery can play on mankind. This can be seen in a few different instances in

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