Zora Neale Hurston

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  • Their Eyes Were Watching God By Zora Neale Hurston

    1253 Words  | 6 Pages

    typical image of women staying and maintaining the home, women started attending universities, receiving professional jobs, and becoming involved in politics (1). The transition of women from the domestic sphere to the public sphere is a notion Zora Neale Hurston uses in Their Eyes Were Watching God. Hurston’s use of dominant characters in society reveals her theme that experiences and relationships are the roots of finding independence and identity despite the obscurity caused by sexism. Janie’s relationship

  • Their Eyes Were Watching God By Zora Neale Hurston

    1249 Words  | 5 Pages

    “I’m a woman…Phenomenal woman, that’s me.” This quote from Maya Angelou’s poem “Phenomenal Woman” characterizes the common theme between the novel, Their Eyes Were Watching God, by Zora Neale Hurston, the speech, “Ain’t I a Woman”, by Sojourner Truth, and “Phenomenal Woman”. The common theme between these three different pieces is the idea of a strong, independent woman, which ties into feminism and the concept of being equal to men. Even though these three pieces are each diverse genres, they are

  • The Men of Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

    980 Words  | 4 Pages

    The Men of Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston      In Their Eyes Were Watching God, by Zora Neale Hurston, the reader is given a particular glimpse into Janie's life with reference to the men she has known.  Janie's three men are all very different, yet they were all Janie's husband at one point in her life.  Although they all behaved differently, in lifestyle as well as their relationship with Janie, they all shared certain similarities.                Janie's first

  • Analysis Of Their Eyes Were Watching God By Zora Neale Hurston

    1085 Words  | 5 Pages

    Without a doubt, Zora Neale Hurston’s most recognize work Their Eyes Were Watching God alluded to her life. In the book, her main character Janie Crawford went through three marriages, thus resulting in transformation in herself and trying to find her true identity. Similar to Janie Crawford, Hurston herself went through two marriages (“Zora Neale Hurston, Pre-Eminent Harlem”). Janie Crawford was a black woman who yearned for freedom, but was defined by the dominant men in her life. Hurston at a young

  • Their Eyes Were Watching God By Zora Neale Hurston: An Analysis

    1609 Words  | 7 Pages

    Throughout the novel Their Eyes Were Watching God, by Zora Neale Hurston, there is an ongoing story of how Janie, the main character, grows up and deals with the many challenges life throws at her in her quest for her “Horizons”. A horizon is a metaphor for one’s ambitions, hopes and dreams. To be truly happy, one must conceive their own horizons, explore them and embrace them. Janie’s “horizons” evolve throughout the novel, starting as limited and socially determined, moving towards being expansive

  • Their Eyes Were Watching God By Zora Neale Hurston

    1229 Words  | 5 Pages

    Eyes Were Watching God is a prime example of a book that reflects this theme. In Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston, the main character, Janie, struggles to figure out her identity and what she desires in life. As she matures in her relationships and in life, she learns to make sacrifices in order to seek what she really needs. In Their Eyes Were Watching God, Hurston illuminates Janie’s values and the text’s emphasis on self-actualization is demonstrated through Janie leaving stability

  • Their Eyes Were Watching God By Zora Neale Hurston

    2074 Words  | 9 Pages

    In Zora Neale Hurston’s famous novel, Their Eyes Were Watching God, Hurston explores the life of a southern black woman, Janie Crawford whose three marriages of domineering control of men make her acknowledge her independence and self-satisfaction as an African-American woman. Set in the early 1900s, Hurston reveals the dominant role of men in southern society and one woman’s journey toward finding herself and God. Summary: Janie Crawford is a southern African-American woman who grows up under

  • Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

    749 Words  | 3 Pages

    In 1937, Zora Neale Hurston spent seven weeks in Haiti writing what would become her most well-known and acknowledged piece of work. Their Eyes Were Watching God was born on September 18th, 1937, in New York. The novel told a hopeful tale of a woman finding a secure sense of independence and identity in the 1920s. Janie Mae Crawford is the protagonist of the novel. She knows family only in the form of her grandmother, who she refers to as Nanny. Each relationship that Janie is involved in blooms

  • Their Eyes Were Watching God By Zora Neale Hurston

    1352 Words  | 6 Pages

    Persistence is a firm continuance of action in spite of past obstacles and opposition. This is what women like Janie Crawford in Zora Neale Hurston’s novel had to have, to get through traumatic events such as domestic violence and oppression from other men. In Their Eyes Were Watching God the main character Janie Crawford faced oppression and domestic violence, but instead of this holding her back it made a stronger woman by the end of the novel. Janie showed some changes from the beginning

  • Their Eyes Were Watching God By Zora Neale Hurston

    1229 Words  | 5 Pages

    had to perform very tiring and hard jobs for most of the day. In many instances, people lived their whole life working towards freeing themselves from the work but were never able to accomplish their goal. In Their Eyes Were Watching God, by Zora Neale Hurston, the mule is used as a symbol of the way Janie is treated in each of her relationships except when she is with Teacake, demonstrating that it is more worthy to work like a mule with a lover than live a leisurely life without one. When Nannie