Analysis Of Atticus 's ' Kill A Mockingbird '

1394 Words Aug 29th, 2015 6 Pages
Integrity:

After Scout confronts Atticus about “defending negros”, Atticus replies on how this decision is for his own dignity: “‘For a number of reasons’, said Atticus. ‘The main one is, if I didn’t, I couldn’t hold up my head in town, I couldn’t represent this county in the legislature, I couldn’t even tell you or Jem not to do something again.’” (123; ch.9). Out of the lots of prejudice in Maycomb County, Atticus is one that looks passed race and gender. He holds equal respect for those who abide by the laws of being human. Not much of population consist of people like Atticus, who is not just fighting for Tom for the sake of the town, but for his own virtue. It takes a lot of integrity to stand up for what is right during that time and that is exactly what Atticus is making an effort to do.

When Atticus and Scout are discussing Tom Robinson’s case, he informs Scout about the backlash she will be hearing in school and how to rise above it: “‘You might hear some ugly talk about it at school, but do one thing for me if you will: you just hold your head high and keep those fist down’… ‘Try fighting with your head for a change’”. (124; ch.9). Scout first instinct when it comes to anything infuriating is to fight, which causes her some trouble. As a respectable person, Atticus tells Scout that the way to rise above the anger inside is to keep it to herself. She doesn’t fight the whole rest of the novel, which creates a stronger mentality for such a spontaneous girl. It…
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