Analysis Of The Movie ' The Great Gatsby '

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Several will agree that they were at the edge of their seat waiting for the movie of the year to be released. The release day of “The Great Gatsby” seemed millenniums away, but finally the day so many awaited arrived. Now, the real question is, was the movie worth the wait? Some might agree, myself included, that the movie was disappointment and was below what many expected. The expectation that the book itself would be brought to life was not met. I expected to be transported into this 1920 setting, living the life of the Great Gatsby himself, but instead, as Richard Brody says, I, along with everyone else, was given extraordinary actors working together in an extremely modern sumptuously-realized Jazz Age extravaganza telling a…show more content…
It would be ideal for the director of the movie to portray the same messages and if not, at least provide the audience with the idea that these messages are still be portrayed throughout the movie. Baz Luhrmann, the director of the movie, only provides the audience with a lost love reencounter, a couple of marriages unhinged, lives violently lost, the disappointment of a New York newcomer, and, the end of a time of legendary exuberance. The director had so much material to work with and yet he didn’t make the most of it. The way Richard Brody sees it is simple and I could agree more. Luhrmann has a rich lode of material, yet all he did with it was focus on the recap of the Great Gatsby’s life through the eyes of Nick Carraway. All we see is extravagant parties that bring together an old love, the lavish lifestyle the lone Gatsby lives, and at the end we are given brutal ending. Fitzgerald provided his audience with so much more than just lavish lifestyle and love stories. He provided an insight into the roaring 20’s and Luhrmann fails to give the movie that over the top touch Fitzgerald provided his readers with. It may be that Luhrmann spent a lot of money to put his grand vision of the novel onto the screen, but he seems to be apologizing for it in advance. All we see throughout the movie is the extravagant night life along with the obscenely generous expenditures of the rich, which offered nothing but destructive amusements for themselves and their friends, and it
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