And The Imporatance In The Gambler, By Fyodor Dostoyevsky

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“The Gambler“ and the imporatance of distinct charachters in novels

No one can deny that the psychological novel displays to the greatest extent how a variety of different characters is important for an enjoyable read. Such is the emphasis on the internal events and the inner mental life of its characters, that this type of the novel is probably one of a kind in which characterization is more prominent than in all other literary genres. First examples originate from earlier epochs, but only a few could argue whether one of the greatest representatives of this genre was a Russian writer Fyodor Dostoyevsky or not. Though he is best known for his other novels, Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, The Possessed and The Brothers Karamazov, this text offers a take on characters of his fascinating short novel The Gambler which was written in 1866. Two topics are woven within the zealously intricated storyline. The one is desperate longing for a distant woman and the another one is a passion for gambling that Dostoyevsky himself at the time was struggling with. At the same time, the novel was inspired by the topic
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We got to know a sad and unexpected truth about Alexei’s character. He is compulsively drawn into gambling like all the other characters who crave for risks and elusive luck. He asks himself: “Can I possibly not understand myself that I'm a lost man? But why can't I resurrect? Yes! It only takes being calculating and patient at least once in your life and that's all! It only takes being steadfast at least once, and in an hour I can change my whole destiny!” Yet we do not know how that ends. His personal struggle is left unresolved. He might have had an another crack at trying to connect with the women of his dreams when Mr. Astley tells him that she was in love with him all the time, but a bad feeling in the reader’s stomach tells us that he might very easily go back to

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