Book Review of Edmund S. Morgan's The Birth of the Republic, 1763-89.

581 Words 3 Pages
Edmund Sears Morgan, the author of, The Birth of the Republic, was a Sterling Professor of History at Yale University. Morgan's studies focused on American colonial history and English history. He wrote many books examining the colonial period and the period of Revolution, an example of which is The Birth of the Republic. He is also known for writing a best-selling biography of Benjamin Franklin.1
In The Birth of the Republic, Morgan tells the story of the birth of America and its road to independence, as well as the period after the Revolutionary War, in a blunt and concise manner. He begins by describing an era in which American civilians lived happily, enjoying an appropriate amount of freedom under the ruling of England; their owned
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Edmund Sears Morgan, the author of, The Birth of the Republic, was a Sterling Professor of History at Yale University. Morgan's studies focused on American colonial history and English history. He wrote many books examining the colonial period and the period of Revolution, an example of which is The Birth of the Republic. He is also known for writing a best-selling biography of Benjamin Franklin.1
In The Birth of the Republic, Morgan tells the story of the birth of America and its road to independence, as well as the period after the Revolutionary War, in a blunt and concise manner. He begins by describing an era in which American civilians lived happily, enjoying an appropriate amount of freedom under the ruling of England; their owned property guaranteed their freedom. As soon as the Parliament of England imposed taxes American people after the costly war with France, Americans' freedom was threatened. The book briefly describes the revolutionary war since it is not meant to examine the military aspect excessively. Furthermore, Morgan thoroughly described how the Articles of Confederation was reformed to become the United States Constitution, explaining that it was due to the fact that state governments enjoyed too much power, while central (federal) government was too weak.
The author takes into the humanitarian aspect of revolution in prospect; he talks about how Americans wanted to be equal to Englishmen in respect to being represented in the House of Parliament. The
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