Censorship in North Korea

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Introduction
Delving deep into the history of how new media has the ability to cause the autocratic ways of governments to run into a stone wall, the infamous incident of how university students of Indonesia leveraged on the power of e-mail to overthrow the then corrupt President Suharto presents itself as an excellent illustration. Through examining more recent cases where the citizens of Tunisia and Egypt have tapped on the power of social media to help upend the existing political order, the potency of new media becomes apparent. Amidst volatile and rapidly evolving preferences and uses for different forms of new media, North Korea remains entrenched in the situation where all types of media are state-owned; where the Internet is
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However, it is essential to note that the climate of fear could paralyse the citizens such that they remain nonchalant about their lack of freedom, assuming the government is able to satisfy their basic needs. From another point of view, this assumption could prove problematic on its own. Although North Korea could rank low on the Power Distance Index due to the communist emphasis on equality and minimizing status differences (Birnbaum-More, Wong and Olve, 1995), it is notable that the Power Distance Index is malleable and can shift in the face of ideological pressures (McGrath, MacMillan, Yang, Tsai, 1992) i.e. the communist regime in North Korea. Hence the people are reluctant to question authority and the fear to disagree is substantial (Birnbaum-More et al., 1995). Therefore, the citizens of North Korea could be less particular about their restricted status of freedom because they accept the commands of the government ‘dutifully’.
To limit the scope of discussion, it would now be appropriate to define the term “influence”. The influence of the influx of new media on the North Korean government would allude to the extent to which the dictatorship nature of the
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