Compare Two Western Films Made at Least Twenty Years Apart on the Basis of the Three of the Five Frameworks Studied in the First Block of the Unit, and the Elements of the Western Genre Studied in the Second Block of the Unit.

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Author: Ben Nichols Student ID: 394990 Course Name: CMM10 Screen History and Research Assessment 2: Comparative Essay Description: Compare two Western films made at least twenty years apart on the basis of the three of the five frameworks studied in the first block of the unit, and the elements of the western genre studied in the second block of the unit. Films selected: The Great Train Robbery (1903) v True Grit (2010) Introduction: When Thomas Edison asked Edwin S.Porter to make The Great Train Robbery (1903) little did either realise that this film would be the beginning of not only the Western genre but an entire movie industry. The silent classic, The Great Train Robbery depicts a famous railroad robbery by a notorious…show more content…
The audience, the industry, and the technology were all very different but what both films where aiming to achieve is very similar. They are trying to bring to life stories about America’s heart and soul using the best visual skill and capabilities they had available to them. They are also one of the stories of Film History. It is the historian’s contention that ‘understanding the past is useful in understanding the present’ (Allan and Gomery, 1985 p6). Indeed, It can be further argued that without the former it is very unlikely we would be enjoying the latter. They are so different visually but they are the same in their goals; depicting a great literal story, through the medium of film. Film Technology: Edison Films unwitting invention of the movie-making industry was driven by a desperate struggle to make a profit out of his failing product, the Kinetoscope. He was under commercial attack from rival systems and needed a strong marketing tool to save the flagging technology. Edwin S Porter, Edison’s chief cameraman, produced The Great Train Robbery and the rest is history. Not a straightforward teleogical history though with a beginning and a pre-determined end with the goal of making films more real. Realism is a relative term in filmmaking. When the actor, George Barnes appears at the beginning/end of The Great Train Robbery dressed as the bandit chief and fires his pistol straight at

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