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Correlation Between Satisfaction And Pain Intensity

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The considerable interest in satisfaction related to pain as an outcome variable waned after investigators studied postoperative and cancer patients and found poor correlations between satisfaction and pain intensity. In these studies, patients commonly reported moderate to severe pain (>4 on a 0-10 scale), but indicated they were satisfied with their pain management (Cohen, 1980; Dawson et al., 2002; Jamison, Taft, O 'Hara, & Ferrante, 1993; Miaskowski, Nichols, Brody, & Synold, 1994). These findings are counter intuitive, and authors have speculated about explanations for the inconsistency. Not many authors, however, have considered the validity of the satisfaction item. Most investigators measured satisfaction with pain management, not pain intensity, but the former is a vague concept that could be interpreted many ways. A few investigators measured satisfaction with pain relief or satisfaction with pain level in small samples (Corizzo, Baker, & Henkelmann, 2000) and did not observe the inconsistency that investigators observed when measuring satisfaction with pain management. Cancer is a common health problem frequently associated with pain and is an important illness condition for studying patient satisfaction. The incidence of patients with cancer is on the rise both nationally and worldwide with projected global numbers for 2030 at 21.4 million new cases and 13.2 million deaths per year (Boyle, 2008). Pain is a major symptom in 40-50% of newly diagnosed patients

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