Democratic Power In Canada

1416 Words6 Pages
With the rise of democratic power in the world’s societies, comes also many problems that plague the citizens in those societies with regards of how the government uses and applies that democratic power. The structure of the Canadian government is an example, as are many other democratic organizations, of how despite the fact that the power is elected by the people of Canada, it also has created an unbalanced entity that creates somewhat of a disadvantage to the citizens. Within the fundamental documents that grant the people of Canada the rights and freedoms they are entitled to as well as outline the extent of the government’s power, also provide the government the ability to veto bills that were voted in by the population. In addition, the…show more content…
However, in Section 33, there exists the “notwithstanding clause”. Section 33 of the Charter allows the provincial government power to override rules over bills that have been deemed not suitable by courts. More specifically, it allows the power to override rulings on bills pertaining to violation constitutional freedoms and rights, such as the practice of a religion . Although the notwithstanding clause does not enable governments (federal, provincial and/or territorial legislatures) to deprive people of a Charter right or freedom, it does however protect the law that has been passed from being struck down and removed. Although it is not a permanent solution, this still demonstrates the fact that the government can suppress the freedoms and rights given to citizens by the Charter albeit not…show more content…
Here it sees another fundamental flaw that lessens the sense of democracy in our government. The Senate is recognized as the chamber of “sober second thought”, as it goes through in much finer detail bills that have been passed through the House of Commons . Although the Senate was created to counterbalance the partisan representation in the House of Commons with equal regional representation, Senators are usually sitting as members of political parties and therefore somewhat render the role of the Senate moot. As Senators are appointed members, they are selected from regions, as required, but are appointed specifically by the major party in power. This situation, put in context anywhere else is clearly a conflict of interest and furthers the problem that is present in the House of Commons, party
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