Effects of False Memories Essay examples

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False memories have been the subject of many studies since Deese (1959) investigated their effects.
False memories include distorting features of events and situations or recalling facts and memories that never occurred at all (Roediger and McDermott, 1995).
Roediger and McDermott’ (1995), experiment based on Deese’s (1959) experiment renewed the interest in false memories and invented the Deese-McDermott-Roediger Paradigm which many studies surround. Their study focused on eliciting false memories through receiving lists of words and being asked to recall those that were present from a separate list that included a critical word that if recalled, showed presence of false memory effects. Notably many participants were sure that the
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False memories have been the subject of many studies since Deese (1959) investigated their effects.
False memories include distorting features of events and situations or recalling facts and memories that never occurred at all (Roediger and McDermott, 1995).
Roediger and McDermott’ (1995), experiment based on Deese’s (1959) experiment renewed the interest in false memories and invented the Deese-McDermott-Roediger Paradigm which many studies surround. Their study focused on eliciting false memories through receiving lists of words and being asked to recall those that were present from a separate list that included a critical word that if recalled, showed presence of false memory effects. Notably many participants were sure that the critical word had appeared previously, demonstrating how much our memory can be influenced.
Several studies have tested how false memory effects occur and whether they can be elicited by semantically or phonologically similar words or in relation to doctored photographs.
Watson, Balota and Roediger (2003) included not only semantic words but also phonologically similar words. Their results found that both phonologically similar and semantic words can produce false memories and have stronger effects together than separately. Watson, Balota and Roediger (2003) included a remember/know component that found remembering a word was linked to semantic words and knowing a word had appeared with phonological words. In relation to eyewitness-testimony

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