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Frankenstein Monster Analysis

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The True Monster in Mary-Ann Shelley’s Frankenstein In Frankenstein, written by Mary-Ann Shelley, Shelley portrays Victor as the ultimate monster. Throughout the novel, Shelley tests Victor’s morals and reveals him to be arrogant and selfish. She depicts his immorality through the creation of the creature, his decision to uphold his reputation and sacrifice mankind, and through abandoning his creature. Shelley illustrates Victor’s monstrous characteristics through the creation of the creature. When Victor attends university at Ingolstadt, he decides to pursue his studies in the Sciences. Fascinated by the creation of life, he begins to study human anatomy and decay. He seeks to be omnipotent, and therefore, creates “[a] new species…show more content…
Consequently, the creature is left- abandoned and alone, and experiences the cruelty of mankind. Months following the death of Victor’s younger brother, William, Victor encounters his creature on Mount Montanvert. The creature implores for Victor’s guidance and compassion, but Victor attacks him and demands that he leave. Consequently, Victor is immoral for having neglected his own creature, and for treating him as “the fallen angel” (96), which represents the devil. Furthermore, whether the creature will “lead a harmless life or become the scourge of [Victor’s] fellow creatures and the author of [Victor’s] speedy ruin” (98) is in the hands of his creator. Out of pure detestation, however, Victor chooses to deprive the creature of happiness. He describes the “fierce vengeance of [his] arm wreaked on [the creature’s] miserable head” (95), and vows to avenge the death of his brother. Through the brutal treatments from humans and his own creator, the creature alienates himself and resorts to inflicting pain on mankind. Essentially, Victor’s betrayal and inability to sympathize nor accept his own creature depicts him as the true monster. Moreover, Victor’s immorality is depicted through his decision to save his own reputation, rather than admitting his wrong doings. In addition to withholding critical information, Victor does nothing to prevent the possible massacre of humans. Two years following the creation of
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