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Frederick Douglass’ Outright and Subtle Irony

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Frederick Douglass’ Outright and Subtle Irony

Frederick Douglass’ Outright and Subtle Irony Frederick Douglass’ autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave offers a depiction of slavery like very few before him, from his firsthand accounts. Douglass wanted to show his opposition to slavery and knew he would meet many criticisms. Due to this criticism, he had to mask much of his work with irony. Some of his works are obvious and others are a bit harder to see. The more difficult ones were put in place by Douglass in order to provide a deep and profound statement, without arousing too much opposition. If he had he would have faced much more threats than he did. He not only
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Master Thomas was one of the many pious slaveholders who hold slaves for the very charitable purpose of taking care of them." (p. 77) The irony in this passage is showing that even though Master Thomas was a newly religious person practicing a peaceful religion that teaches to help the poor and helpless, he
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