Good vs. Evil in Kipling’s Rikki-Tikki-Tavi Essay

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Good vs. Evil in Kipling’s Rikki-Tikki-Tavi

Kipling’s Rikki Tikki Tavi has all the necessary parts of a battle story. It is full of battles, war tactics, good, evil, motive, song, and drama.

A battle story needs a gripping introduction, one that hints at the battles to come and one that brings the reader in with an exciting anticipation. This story first begins with a poem of the brave Rikki Tikki angrily chasing death with a lust to kill. It right away shows the necessary bravery and strength of the protagonist/hero and the might and evil of the antagonist. The lines like… Eye to eye and head to head This shall end when one is dead …start the book with the promise of great fights between two great forces.
The first paragraph is
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The mongoose, though young and inexperienced, has already proven himself in battle for living through an attempted kill by a lethal cobra.

The conflict here, is that the snakes know “that mongooses in the garden meant death sooner or later” and so must protect themselves, their children, and their land by killing the mongoose. It is a common conflict, one where both sides are simply trying to survive and must kill to do so.

Another battle is then started; a slightly larger battle than the last, as it is customary for all battles to increasingly become greater and greater until the climax. The karait attempts to kill the boy who has taken such good care of Rikki Tikki and once again Rikki is unselfishly loyal and strikes out to defend the boy. The family is very grateful and Rikki is deemed a hero.

Rikki has already made many friends and informants. One such informant is muskrat, who tells him of the snakes’ plans to invade the house. Rikki instantly goes to work patrolling the house, caring not for his own safety but bravely protecting those whom he loves. He finds Nag in the bathroom and waits for the right time to strike. When Nag is finally asleep he courageously leaps and grabs hold of nag’s head.

Then he jumped. The head was lying a little clear of the water-jar, under the curve of it; and, as his teeth met, Rikki

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