Incidents In The Life Of A Slave Girl Is A Novel With A

1242 WordsFeb 21, 20175 Pages
Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl is a novel with a clear and concise purpose: to convince white women, preferably with families, in the American Northern states to adopt, support, and advocate freedom for slaves in the Southern states. Harriet Jacobs, through her narrative of her own traumatizing experiences as a slave, brings to her desired readers a view into the world of slavery that was not so commonplace: one that told of the true horrors slaves suffered not only in the hands of their slave masters, but through the systemic and widespread institution of slavery. In her accounts of slavery, Jacobs recounts the times in which the slave owner, under pretense or not, cared for the slave. In this vein, the incident pertaining to Aunt…show more content…
Flint herself claiming Aunt Nancy used to sleep lying near her “on the entry floor.” These descriptors work to paint an image of Aunt Nancy as a guard canine, not a fellow human being. In conjunction, the reader for once sees a moment of “humanity” from Dr. Flint; he attempts to console Martha by claiming that the only person to fill Aunt Nancy’s place would be Linda. The reader is introduced to the concept of ethical slavery at this very moment. Ethical slavery claims to be for the wellbeing and health and happiness of slaves, not for the greed of the slave and plantation owners. As Mrs. Flint and Martha mourn the death of Aunt Nancy (of course, for wildly different reasons), Dr. Flint attempts to manipulate Martha at her most vulnerable state, the death of her only remaining daughter, showcasing that his gain is above her most base humanity. Jacobs continuously sets and solidifies Dr. Flint as a truly evil, greedy, lustful, and sinful man -corrupting Linda (Jacobs) even as an adolescent and setting the truest example of the extreme vices of slavery. One of the more telling accounts of this is the letter Miss Emily Flint’s brother supposedly sends to Linda while she is a fugitive working in New York. This letter, written in the most compassionate language: “we all sympathize with you in your unfortunate condition,” “The family will be rejoiced to see you,” and “Come home,” could
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