Jewish Literature And The Holocaust

899 WordsFeb 1, 20174 Pages
Holocaust literature is one of the emerging field in literature during the second half of the twentieth century. Several Holocaust survivors wrote about the atrocities they witnessed and their experiences during the incarceration. The word “Holocaust” encompasses images of death, horror, and inhumanity. Although many survivors find it difficult to talk aabout their experience, some of the took an oath to use their pen to protest against such horrible genocide and to make sure that this would never happen again. Primo Levi (1919-1987) and Elie Wiesel (1928-2016) were among those writers who made a significant contribution to the modern Jewish literature in general and the Holocaust in particular. Primo Levi is best known for his grandeur…show more content…
Perhaps the most difficult part in studying the Holocaust literature is the language itself. Those who witnessed the Holocaust find it difficult to write about their experiences. Levi once said that words are difficult to describe the horror and feelings of the survivors of the Holocaust (Hornstein, Jacobowitz 1). Levi and Wiesel have fundamental differences with their experiences, observations, and reactions during their incarceration at the camp. The structure of the sentences in Levi’s memoir are concise, yet emotionally charged. Wiesel’s writing, on the other hand, is filled sometimes with religious ideas and prayers and in some occasions a total despair and anger with God. It is important to know that when Eliezer first arrived to Auschwitz, he sees things through a child’s eyes. He was fourteen years old. The fact that he lied about his age is a crucial moment to show his love to his old, sick father. Throughout the novel, Eliezer uses his naïve optimism and faith to survive. On the other hand, Levi was twenty-four years old when arrived to the camp. He was mature enough to use his genius and expertise to survive the horror. As the events unfold in Night, Eliezer witnesses the burning of the bodies and that immediately crushes his soul. He starts to lose his faith in society and questions the impartiality of God and the divine intervention to save them from such horrible pain. Eliezer sees the flames raising from a ditch and
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