Essay about Legalizing Physician Assisted Suicide

1074 Words5 Pages
For hundreds of years we have developed a system where human beings establish and revise rules and regulations that help protect individual lives in our society. However this protection ends when it is time to die. Legalizing physician assisted suicide is
“It’s my life!” an expression that is commonly used at one point in most everyone’s life. Is it my life? Do I get to make all the choices that involve my life? More importantly, who is in charge of my body? Ultimately human beings believe that they have the right to live their lives the way they see fit. However, contrary to popular belief, legally we don’t have that right. One might think that as individual, they have the right to decide what happens to their bodies. We know
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Paul Schotsman in his essay The Ethical Claim of a Dying Brother illustrates his brother’s final experiences on this earth. Futhermore, he expresses the reality that pain medication does not always work. Schotsman writes “The pain, the lack of air, experiences of suffocating with an intense degree of anxiety, screaming for help... regularly I had him in my arms during these days, as he was begging for air… His wife could no longer watch it and ran away, as she did not want to see her beloved one, who could also be so aggressive in his painful moments, go through all this… The most shocking experience, almost a radical negation of my illusions, was that pain treatment was not always as successful as I thought it would be”(Schotsman). Society relies on the assumption that prescribed pain medication eliminates the suffering that certain terminally ill endure.
There is a vast difference between killing people who ask for death under appropriate circumstances, and killing people without their permission. Taking one’s life before it is their time to die is completely wrong. That is the exact opposite of what PAS will accomplish. The requirements of the Oregon Death with Dignity Act (DWDA) substantiate that fact. The World Federation of Right to Die explains some of the DWDA’s
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