Lord Of The Flies Critical Analysis

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When reading the Lord of the Flies, by William Golding, many people have been tending to question; Would the same situations and experiences have occurred if the characters were all little girls? A remake with all girls wouldn’t work well with the type of plot, unlike the boys, they would build their own groups with respect and peace. The boys choose the leader of the island based on toughness, strength, and ability to exhibit acts of violence. Since the boys tend to focus on these predominantly masculine traits, the island will ultimately end up in chaos, in a patriarchal society. With a group of boys stranded on an island alone and without adult supervision, lots of wrongs are yet to be transpired. With an absence of girls in the Lord of the Flies, both the author and audience of all ages reading have a better look at the animalistic characters in most youthful boys, especially when left without authority on a deserted island, stranded. All the boys have an image that men are supposed to be the providers, skillful hunters, and they are eager to play out that stereotypical role throughout the novel. “Now out of the terror rose another desire, thick, urgent, blind. “Kill the beast! Cut his throat! Spill his blood!” (99). The group of boys is conveyed by the author in a frenzied state when they kill Simon horrifically. They want to be looked at as rough and violent, in order to have that title of the “leader”. For example, Jack leading a group of young boys in fear of a

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