Lost Generation By F. Scott Fitzgerald

1396 Words6 Pages
The XXth century in the USA is the remarkable period, not only economically, socially, culturally and spiritually. American literature grew up to a new level with the advent of such a flow as the Modernism. Modernism Literature reached its peak in America from the 1920s to the 1940s. F. Scott Fitzgerald was one of the most prominent representatives of this genre and entered Modernism in the United States above all as the first exponent of his ideas. In the works of Fitzgerald the topic “Lost generation” is in disastrous pursuit of wealth that swept the young post-war America.
The fact that Fitzgerald wrote about rich people and their lives is almost always present critical and sober look. Like a true artist, he was always very honest and open to readers. His best books were in literature as the authentic confirmation of insolvency bourgeois ideals, the collapse of the "American Dream" and the tragedy of people that followed the imaginary moral compass. Because they still do not lose their relevance. The significance of his achievements as an artist in "The Great Gatsby" is none other than as a result of the finest weave of personal and social in the book.
Perhaps none of the American writers managed to look into such depths of the psyche of his countrymen, and so fully explore them, as did F. Scott Fitzgerald. In his novel, the author looked into the depths of the soul of each of his heroes, to show the reader the essence of human motives and the motives their actions,
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