Macbeth's Mental State with Quotes

1195 Words Mar 10th, 2013 5 Pages
Macbeth 's general mental state throughout the Play
“ All his earlier work was naturalistic and realistic - Finally, in the last paintings, the canvasses became nonsense”
-Oliver Sacks 558

When the play first start 's Macbeth is referred to by King Duncan his “Worthiest cousin” but later on in the play Macbeth begins to show signs of mental illness perhaps due to traumatizing events such as killing Duncan, and ordering the murderers to hunt down Banquo, and his son. When Macbeth begins to see the ghosts of Banquo it shows signs of remorse or regret on his conscience, and basically it begins to ruin him. Just like Dr.P 's paintings at first they were sensible pieces of art and as the illness progressed so did his mentality.
“All
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“To thus is nothing, but to be safely thus. Our fear 's in Banquo”
-Macbeth III I 53-54

Although Oliver Sacks did not speak about this disorder in his analysis of Dr.P many greek tales and other plays written by Macbeth have showed that people that gain power through immoral ways tend to get very paranoid over their power. For example when Chronos bore the 12 original Olympians he feared that they would eventually grow up and take his throne, so he ate them. Another example might be from Macbeth when Duncan 's sons are accused of killing their own father to gain the throne. Also like in many of these tales this brings their own downfall, a sort of karma. When Macbeth becomes so paranoid over power and kills Banquo his nobles leave him and in the end he is killed. Just like Zues who eventually rose up and threw Chronos into the pits or Tantalus
“Here is a place reserved sir – Thou canst not say I did it, never shake.”
-III iiii 55-62

“But there is problems with the visual parts of your brain – you must see a neurologist.”
-Oliver Sacks 551

When Macbeth see 's Banquo 's ghost sitting in his seat, I think that he did not have a strong enough reaction for someone who just saw a ghost of their former comrade sitting in their dining room seat. Macbeth also
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