New Orleans And The Child

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1850: New Orleans woman and the child she held in slavery.
New Orleans has a rich history that can be marveled at, as well as be frowned upon. As a constituent of the greater Louisiana, New Orleans was at the heart of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Slaves were imported from West Africa, as well as India and then tasked with working in the robust cotton farms that characterized New Orleans at the time (Blassingame 5). Women slaves were mostly assigned to households where they worked as house helps, as well as babysitters. To this end, women developed close ties with most of their slave owners. In the image, New Orleans woman and the child she held in slavery, it is apparent that the girl worked for the woman and there was a lot of
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It represents a majority of ills that afflicted 18th, 19th, and early 20th century America. Through this photograph, one can appreciate how far America has come as a nation in terms of having the capacity to resolve the issues that plagued American society. Further, through this photograph, one can tell how the suffering faced by migrants who came in as slaves played a huge role in creating a better American society.
One of the most unique things about New Orleans particularly in the 18th and 19th centuries where this image is derived from was race and racism. People were excluded or included, considered inferior or superior based on the race they belonged to. To this end, Indians, and African Americans were classified on the lower end of the race totem pole while whites were seen as superior. Furthermore, one’s stance in society or occupation was determined by their race. The whites were majorly businessmen and land owners presiding over big farms that they owned. The blacks and the Indians were mostly peasants ‘owned’ by the white people and forced to work on the farms of the white people against their will owing to the fact that they were imported from their original residences as slaves (Appleby, Eileen and Neva 18). It is, therefore, clear that race and racism played a significant role in helping define New Orleans as we know it today. Bringing racism to the fore provides a platform upon which it can be alleviated to help
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