Obesity As A Body Mass Index ( Bmi )

1458 WordsJan 25, 20176 Pages
Broadly speaking, overweight and obesity is caused when an energy imbalance between energy consumed and calories expanded takes place. The cause for this energy imbalance is often complex, resulting from the multifactorial interactions between genetics, overeating, slow metabolism, medications, and physiological factors. Obesity can be measured in several ways; the most widely used technique is BMI. Body Mass Index (BMI) is a measure of size based on a person’s mass and height (NHLBI, 2015). Obesity is defined as having a Body Mass Index (BMI) between 25 kg/m2 and 30kg/m2 or having a body fat percent of 25% in males and 35% in females. Since the 1980’s, obesity worldwide has doubled (World Health Organization, 2014). In 2008, over 1.4…show more content…
The CDC (2008b) reported that biological consequences of childhood obesity include hypertension, osteoarthritis, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, gall bladder disease, sleep apnea, respiratory problems, and some cancers. The obesity epidemic has been described as a “threatening storm” that may result in reduced life expectancy as early as the first half of this century, with the current generation of children living shorter and less healthy lives than their parents (Olshansky et al., 2005). Children are beginning to exhibit the signs and symptoms of disease processes and illnesses that were once associated only to adults. Such diseases include diabetes, heart disease, vascular disease, and certain cancers. There is a strong correlation between persons with Type II diabetes (formerly known as adult-onset diabetes) and being overweight or obese. By controlling childhood obesity, our society may go a long way toward preventing diabetes (“Fight,” 2004). Lavizzo-Mourey (2005) called America’s adolescents the most obese teenagers in the world, and stated that this may be the first generation of Americans who will live sicker and die younger than their parents. Smith et al. (2005) echoed Lavizzo-Mourey’s sentiments, reporting that overweight and obesity have been connected to the previously
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