Personal Experience: Moving On

671 WordsFeb 20, 20183 Pages
It was surely the emptiest feeling I’d ever experienced when Coty’s courageous battle ended. As a parent, I invested the best of what I had to give emotionally, and I did whatever I could to bring out the superior qualities he possessed. The way he dealt with his unfortunate circumstances was a testament to his character, and he won the admiration of many, even those who only had casual contact with him. We had been staying at a Baltimore Inner Harbor condominium complex near Federal Hill. Visually it was a nice setting with docks in front of the condominiums and a view of ships and other boats entering the waterfront. A Domino Sugar factory was across the harbor, and we’d watch ships tie up and unload for a period of several days before moving out to make room for the next ship. There was a small balcony where I’d sit and watch the activity in the busy waterway. At night the letters of a giant sign erected on top of the factory were lighted in yellow with “Domino” in italics and “Sugar” below it etched in standard print. The border of the sign was illuminated in a reddish-orange. There was a restaurant named Lilies and a coffee shop named the Barista in the complex. Coty was confined to a wheelchair and needed oxygen and a mask to breathe. When he felt up to it, he’d get someone to wheel him down to the Barista for a Red Bull and something sweet to eat. I remember one morning when the proprietor asked Coty how he was doing. Coty lifted his mask to speak and replied, “I’m
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