Population Growth Of The Industrial Revolution

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The Industrial Revolution was a time of great age throughout the world. It represented significant change from 1760 to the period 1820 to 1840. Great Britain was the birthplace of the industrial revolution and the movement affected everything from industrial manufacturing processes to the everyday life of an average citizen.
Despite the huge variation in societies, the movement took a long time to appear. Kremer argued that the movement occurred with the increase in population, allowing society to generate more ideas so that growth of real GDP per person could grow. Furthermore, the geographical location of Eurasia made innovation more likely to occur there than in the Americas or Australia, allowing contact with other communities to happen and let ideas spread and generate further ideas. In support of this, there is a positive correlation between the size of the population in England where between 1750 and 1850, it more than doubled and the growth of efficiency before 1850. As a result, it is likely that the increased population helped cause the concurrent production of more ideas. In further support of Kremer’s theory, for ideas to be produced in proportion to population, idea production must also be proportional to the existing stock of ideas; that each idea opens the possibility for creation of new ideas. Because of these assumptions, population size predicts efficiency growth well until 1800.
Population growth further explains why the industrial revolution began in
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