Pursuit Of Unhappiness. A Dream That Can Never Be Fully

1470 Words6 Pages
Pursuit of Unhappiness
A Dream that can never be fully attained, yet a country is built off the hope it inspires. The American Dream is a battle that can never be won. This concept is emphasised by both ends of the spectrum. On one end, Jay Gatsby, a wealthy man who has been praised for his accomplishment suffers from the lack of love and the willingness to move forward. On the other end, Walter Younger, a poor man without meaning in his life, is surrounded by unconditional love and determination for the future. Due to the flaws of Jay Gatsby and Walter Younger in Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, and Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun, they are unable to achieve the entirety of the American Dream. Both successfully acquire parts of the
…show more content…
Walter passionately responds with “Because it is life, Mama!” (Hansberry 74). Demonstrating his close mindedness, Walter displays the weakness that prevents complete satisfaction by assuming materialism directly correlates with success. Washington points out that, “What Walter dreams of and aggressively pursues is the power that money brings, power being the essence of the only kind of manhood he is willing to accept” ( 97). Walter’s manhood depends upon the authority and influence money would entitle him to, and without that he considers himself a failure. Thus, he has built up the American Dream to such an unattainable point that he lives his life constantly unsatisfied. Through hard work and determination, Gatsby exceeds the expectations of affluence while Walter falls short of wealth, leaving him feel betrayed by the American promise.
From romantic relationships to friendships, love is critical to the fulfilment of the American Dream. Gatsby and Walter encounter various hardships surrounding the difficulty of adequately expressing their affection before the intensity of their ambition erupts through such a delicate emotion as love. For instance, the incident at the hotel when Gatsby demands Daisy to emit she never loved Tom and has only loved Gatsby. Or the moment when Walter dismisses Ruth’s invitation to talk about her pregnancy and rather pities himself because no one is listening to him. Nonetheless, Walter overcomes the issues
Open Document