Ray Bradbury 's Fahrenheit 451

2022 WordsNov 3, 20149 Pages
Symbolism in the Novel Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury A symbol is defined as something that expresses or represents a certain quality or a topic through many different things such as letters, characters, actions, or objects. In the novel Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury, the literary device of symbolism is present through things such as objects, characters, and animals. The objects that represent symbolism are the parlor walls, the books, and the mirrors. The characters that represent symbolism are Montag, Mildred, and Clarisse, and the animals that represent symbolism is the Mechanical Hound, the Snake, and the Salamander. Furthermore, the first way to see this is through the books, mirrors, and the parlor walls in the novel Fahrenheit 451 that symbolize different things. There are three main concepts in Fahrenheit 451 that show symbolism, with the first being the objects. The objects that show symbolism within the novel are the parlor walls, the books, and the mirrors. The parlor walls symbolize how technology has taken over real family, and how they are the new family, or the technological family. This is shown through a conversation between Montag and Mildred, “’ Will you turn off parlor off?’ he asked. ‘That’s my family.’” (Bradbury 46) The parlor walls in the novel Fahrenheit 451 are the main source of entertainment and whoever is watching it can interact with the characters on the parlor walls, which consumes a great deal of time in the society that

More about Ray Bradbury 's Fahrenheit 451

Open Document