Regionalism's Impacts on America, Especially The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

651 WordsJan 29, 20183 Pages
America is over three million miles long, as such, we have many regions with unique settings and accents. In American literature, Regionalism was invented to better convey the aspects of one region in a novel. Regionalism's impact on America can be measured through its popularity in the 1930s, unique writing style, and ongoing influence on writers today (Brooks 1960). According to the Oxford Dictionary, Regionalism refers to " Regional quality, character, or distinctiveness; regionality; esp. the expression of this in literature, art, etc."(Oxford Dictionary, 2014) While this definition is true, Regionalism also refers to the customs and topography of the region in question. Influenced predominantly by the Southwest, Regionalism came into prominence during the early 1900s. Despite the fact that Regionalist novels were written as early the 1880s, novels like The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn did not gain popularity until the 1930s, but have not faded from the public conscious since. At first, the Regionalist style was regarded as coarse by many people of the time. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was banned from the Concord Library. The Concord (Mass.) Public Library committee has decided to exclude Mark Twain's latest book from the library. One member of the committee says that, while he does not wish to call it immoral, he thinks it contains but little humor, and that of a very coarse type. He regards it as the veriest trash (Concord Library, 1885). This regard

    More about Regionalism's Impacts on America, Especially The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

      Open Document