Relationship Between Personality and Achievement in Nursing Student

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I S S U E S A N D IN N O V A T I O N S I N N U R S I N G E D U C A T I O N

A path model of factors influencing the academic performance of nursing students
Richard Ofori BEd MSc RNT RMN
Lecturer, School of Nursing, University of Salford, Manchester, UK

and John P. Charlton BSc PhD
Research Fellow, Psychology and Life Sciences Subject Group, Bolton Institute, Bolton, UK

Submitted for publication 30 March 2001 Accepted for publication 13 February 2002

Correspondence: Richard Ofori, School of Nursing, University of Salford, Peel House, Albert Street, Eccles, Manchester M30 ONN, UK. E-mail: r.ofori@salford.ac.uk

O F O R I R . & C H A R L T O N J .P . ( 2 0 0 2 )

Journal of Advanced Nursing 38(5), 507–515

A path model of
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Thus, the present work sought to build and test a theoretical path model describing inter-relationships among entry characteristics, learning motives, and the academic achievement of nursing students.

Internal control

Supportseeking

Age

Outcome expectancy

Performance Entry qualifications Self-efficacy Academic worries

Figure 1 The theoretical path model developed to explain relationships among the variables studied.

Background
The educational context
The study focused on students taking a module entitled Psychological Perspectives in Nursing. This module is a compulsory part of a preregistration diploma in the nursing course and covers three semesters. A variety of features made the module suitable for the present purpose. The module has a very large enrolment, it is mainly delivered by lectures although students can seek one-to-one academic support, and it is assessed summatively by essay format. Empirical evidence suggests that such an educational context affects the quality of student learning and subsequent performance. For example, large class size negatively affects student performance (Raimondo et al. 1990, Fearnley 1995, Gibbs et al. 1997), student–teacher interactions and class discussions (Mahler et al. 1986, Raimondo et al. 1990). Also, a lecture format retards the development of higher-level cognitive skills, including deep approaches to learning
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