Rhetorical Analysis Of Socrates's Speech

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As Socrates begins his speech, he wants to let the people of the court know that he might not speak in the way that he is supposed to at court since this is his first time in one. The people who have accused him have told the jury not to be persuaded by his speech. He states that he will talk the truth, whereas his accusers did not. He wants to jury to pay attention to the substance of his speech rather than his style. Socrates begins his argument by saying that the people who have brought him in with the charges are only a small number who spoke against him. He is afraid that since the older people have known the jury for a long time, they would make a decision based off their charges. These people who brought charges say that he does not…show more content…
He then says that he is not a person who charges money for being a philosophist. They do help people become better, but he does not do this. He then leads into what could have led to the accusation and stated that he has wisdom. In order to find this, he questioned politicians, poets, and craftsmen. He found that the politicians did not know much of anything, the poets did not understand their work, and the craftsmen only had knowledge in their own field and could not speak about others. Therefore, he stated that he would be wiser than all of them. He knows that he does not know and this helps him truly know what wisdom is. Many people say that Socrates is an expert, but he denies this. He thinks he needs to question people who think they are wise. This makes many young people follow him and when they do not like his claims, they bring charges against…show more content…
I think it is not arrogant because he is able to back up his ideas with facts. When he spoke and questioned the politicians, poets, and craftsmen, it is clear that he might now know what they know, but he also does not think he knows everything. Since the politicians a very wise, they should know how to lead a country. This might lead to trying to know more than what you actually know and believing that you know it. When you do this, you are not wise, but ignorant. Socrates is saying that he is wise because he knows he does not know. For the poets, they could not even analyze their own work. It was clear that there had to be something there for them to write what they did, but since they do not know their work, they are not wise. Socrates is able to understand their work better than they are so this makes him wise. For the craftsmen, it is clear that they are wise in their area of work, but they are not wise in any other fields of work. This makes them wise in one thing where Socrates knows this and therefore, is wise. This led him to believe that he is more wise than anyone else. He understands what he knows and what he does not know and if he does not know, he either wants to learn about it or ignore it. Also, he believes that he is there to see if people recognize if they are wise. He questions them and this leads them to press charges against him because they find out that they
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