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Socrates Essay

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Socrate's First Accusers and Athenian Law Of all confrontations in political philosophy, the biggest is the conflict between philosophy and politics. The problem remains making philosophy friendly to politics. The questioning of authoritative opinions is not easily accomplished nor is that realm of philosophy - the pursuit of wisdom. Socrates was the instigator of the conflict. While the political element takes place within opinions about political life, Socrates asks the question "What is the best regime and how should I live?" Ancient thought is riddled with unknowns and can make no such statement as "how should I live." The Socratic philosophy offers an alternative and prepares the way for the alternative of…show more content…
Perhaps Socrates believs in gods, but if so, they are not the gods of the city. Socrates simply denies that he has had any part in celestial or subterranean inquiry - he simply speaks
"elsewhere". Socrates goes on to say that those who do are reported to be atheists. However, Socrates says that "Zeus does not eveeen exist" (Aristophanes, 367). Socrates replaces Zeus with nature, the permanent and necessary things accessable to reason. This is an outrage to any
Athenian. To deny the gods is to deny faith and ultimately the authoritarian opinions on which their politics is based. Why does Socrates think that he is being unjustly punished?
Chaerophon had told Socrates that the Pythian Oracle had said that Socrates was the wisest man. Socrates admits that
"I am conscious that I am not wise, either much or little"
(Plato, 20b). Socrates wonders what the riddle is and sets out to "refute the divination" (Plato, 20c). This is a prime example of Socrates' impiousness as is his statement in "The
Clouds" where he states "we don't credit Gods"
(Aristophanes, 248). He is attempting to refute the god at
Delphi. Socrates tries to aid his own defense by charging that what he does is in devotion to the god. "Even now I still go around seeking and investigating in accordance with the god" (Plato, 23b). Socrates makes this brash statement yet it is unfounded and untrue because it is not a devine
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