The American Dream By Thomas Wolfe

1556 Words7 Pages
The Epic of America stated that the american dream is “that dream of a land in which life should be better and richer and fuller for everyone no matter what race, or religion with opportunity for each according to ability or achievement (Congress 1). It is not a dream of motor cars and high wages merely, but a dream of social order in which each man and each woman shall be able to attain to the fullest stature of which they are innately capable (Congress 1). Thomas Wolfe said, "to every man, regardless of his birth, his shining, golden opportunity …the right to live, to work, to be himself, and to become whatever thing his manhood and his vision can combine to make him." The american dream has changed from the 1920s to the present dramatically.
The 1920s was a decade of exciting social changes and profound cultural conflicts Sexual mores, gender roles, hairstyles, and dress all changed profoundly during the 1920s. But for many others, the United States seemed to be changing in undesirable ways. The result was a thinly veiled "cultural civil war," in which a pluralistic society clashed bitterly over such issues as foreign immigration, evolution, the Ku Klux Klan, prohibition, women’s roles, and race (A+E Networks). The roaring twenties or the “Jazz Age” It was a decade of prosperity and dissipation, and of jazz bands, bootleggers, bathtub gin, flappers and, marathon dancers. It was in the popular view, the roaring twenties, when the younger generation rebelled against the
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