The American Dream in Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

710 Words Feb 22nd, 2018 3 Pages
Although it has evolved during the past couple of years, many individuals still strive to achieve it. Steinbeck’s novel Of Mice and Men illustrates this American Dream of the 1930’s, which is looked upon as impossible through the failure of George and Lennie’s achievement. “The story Of Mice and Men and the American Dream is known to be somewhat different; it can define the independence and self-sufficiency for an individual and also the freedom that one person gets that comes from owning a land” (Johnson 140). The dream is still present in people’s eyes because they still have that mindset to this day. “Steinbeck intends to present that the dream has finally become a reality for Lennie, but that only possibility is in death because in life things will always happen out of human control, to destroy those dreams” (Burkhead 54). Lennie and George’s dream of owning a farm and living off the “fatta the land” symbolizes this dream, certainly not to realize the dream embraces their remarkable friendship together, their dreams give them life, even if life never allows them to accomplish their dreams. “George and Lennie who travel as a pair both desire that one simple vision of their own land, animals to tend, and a vacation now and then” (Christians 1). The novel does a significant way of demonstrating the American Dream; it is certainly a metaphor for the opportunities that one can earn. Of…